Did vikings sacrifice christans or is that just propoganda

At Each Kilometer

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
4,149
Bulgaria

..and the elders and boyars said: 'let us cast lots upon the boys and girls. Upon whichever one it falls, that one we shall slaughter in sacrifice to the gods'. The lots thrown by the pagan priests, evidently not by chance, fell upon the Christian John. When the messengers told Theodore that his son "had been chosen by the gods themselves to be sacrificed to them", the old warrior decisively answered: “This is not a god, but wood. Today it is, and tomorrow it rots. They do not eat, nor drink nor speak, but are crafted by human hands from wood. God however is One, and the Greeks serve and worship Him. He created heaven and earth, the stars and the moon, the sun and man, and foreordained him to live upon the earth. But these gods, what have they created? They themselves are made. I shall not give my son over to devils.”
St. Nestor the Chronicler, Primary Chronicle​
 
Oct 2019
94
United States
Yes, well, broad enough geography and long enough timeline will ensure that.

There are no finds of this kind from Sweden.
This is moving the goal posts if ever I've seen it.

As I said, the textual sources to this from the Viking age period (Scandinavian late iron age) are all non-Norse Christians, like Adam of Bremen.
Friend, this isn't news to me, nor to anyone else in the topic, and as the link AlpinLuke provided shows, as well as Dr Crawford in the video above points out, we do have evidence of viking age human sacrifices. The site may not be located in Sweden, but I wasn't aware the viking age was confined to Sweden.
For most of the 19th c. the Danes were all officially Celtic, not a Germanic in sight. That was of course because the Danes were happy enough to maintain they had nothing at all in common with the ferkin' Germans at the time. The Germans returned the compliment by adoring the Swedes and Norwegians. And the closer in time and further north and east we move, the more the evidence of human sacrifice seems to dry up.
What in god's name are you talking about?
 
Nov 2018
376
Denmark
For most of the 19th c. the Danes were all officially Celtic, not a Germanic in sight. That was of course because the Danes were happy enough to maintain they had nothing at all in common with the ferkin' Germans at the time. The Germans returned the compliment by adoring the Swedes and Norwegians.
Interesting, do you have any sources for that statement?
It is true that the Danes tried to remove everything that was German after the First Schleswig War.
Something of a task as Danish culture is intimately intertwined with the German.
Because of that, they turned to England and the Anglo-Saxons. N.F.S.Grundtvig had already translated the Beowulf poem to the Danish language in 1820.
However, the tendency was more that the Danes looked inward and built a spiritual Dannevirke.
The Viking Age was popular in the 19th century but they were pagan barbarians after all. Even more popular was the Valdemar era with its Christian crusaders, knights and pious women.
And that was held up as a role model for the youth.
 
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mark87

Ad Honorem
Jan 2014
2,118
Santiago de Chile
Ibn Fadlan a non christian (Muslim) writes that in the Volga region the vikings sacrificed slave girls/women to honor chieftains (he witnessed a viking funeral there). The traditional Norse religion called for sacrifice every nine years according to Adam of Bremen, there was naturally a propaganda element but to my knowledge the human sacrifice aspect was not made up.

Source A History of the Vikings by Gwyn Jones.
 

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
6,116
We have no Viking age (or earlier) ship graves with human sacrifices like Ibn Fadlan describes. We have a vast archaeological site at Old Uppsala, the specific place Adam of Bremen described, but no evidence of Viking age, or earlier, human sacrifice. (The great temple was also probably built in direct imitation of Christian church architecture, to meet the new competition from the new faith.)

There are plenty of evidence of human sacrifice, from Ireland, England, Low Countries, Germany, Denmark, a few in Norway too – but only one case (Stone Age) in Sweden – now possibly a second mid Iron Age one. There's loads of material objects sacrificed by being sunk in bogs and lakes in Sweden, just like the bog bodies elsewhere, beginning at least in the Bronze Age (possibly earlier), just no humans.

At the very least it would seem to indicate practices could vary considerably, over time and place.