Diets and civilizations

Oct 2016
1,168
Merryland
Also, this vegetable is only available in China currently:
very interesting, I had never heard of.
never heard of a food plant needing a certain fungus.
since it's illegal to transplant most of us will never taste this.

I believe there is some sort of corn smut that is considered a delicacy in the USA; quite the same issue of course.
 

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
4,970
India
very interesting, I had never heard of.
never heard of a food plant needing a certain fungus.
since it's illegal to transplant most of us will never taste this.

I believe there is some sort of corn smut that is considered a delicacy in the USA; quite the same issue of course.
Carp fish is considered as an invasive species in America while in Asia its considered as a delicacy or commonly eaten fish.
 
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Ichon

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
3,708
very interesting, I had never heard of.
never heard of a food plant needing a certain fungus.
since it's illegal to transplant most of us will never taste this.

I believe there is some sort of corn smut that is considered a delicacy in the USA; quite the same issue of course.
Corn smut and some other fungus allowed Pueblo peoples and some others to eat a diet +70% maize and get enough protein as the fungus grew on the stored corn and produced essential amino acids and proteins the prevented nutritional deficiencies. Fungus has a strong relationship with many animal species- beneficial fungus helps while parasitic fungus can slowly kill.
 
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VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,673
Florania
Corn smut and some other fungus allowed Pueblo peoples and some others to eat a diet +70% maize and get enough protein as the fungus grew on the stored corn and produced essential amino acids and proteins the prevented nutritional deficiencies. Fungus has a strong relationship with many animal species- beneficial fungus helps while parasitic fungus can slowly kill.
In the case of Manchurian wild rice, people only use the infected stems as vegetables; they don't eat the grains anymore.
I keep wondering how mushrooms and other edible fungus get into our diets in the first place.
 
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Ichon

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
3,708
In the case of Manchurian wild rice, people only use the infected stems as vegetables; they don't eat the grains anymore.
I keep wondering how mushrooms and other edible fungus get into our diets in the first place.
Quite a bit of evidence acorns were large part of diets of early northern hemisphere humans and I am sure when they were picking up acorns they saw some boars digging up mushrooms and decided to try it. Really the things people will eat today is quite adventurous and that is just for fun, when hunger is involved people will eat rocks and bark. I am sure throughout history someone has eaten just about anything they could get their hands on and fit into their mouth. If they survived and liked the taste the habit of eating it would spread fairly rapidly wherever it was locally available.
 
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