Do German Lutherans are predominately of Saxon origin?

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,359
US
#2
Historically, most of Germany eventually converted to Lutheranism. I know Bavaria (and the Sorbs of course) were the exception. As you may know, the duke, king or emperor established the religion of the area. It wasn't too long after Luther that Calvin and Zwingli arose with their Reformed faith. My mother's ancestors come from Switzerland and the Palatine and they were reformed, eventually worshipping as the German Brethren here in the U.S. The Mennonites and Amish are from this strain. The Reformed denomination gained so many followers in German speaking lands that Frederick eventually combined Lutheranism and Reformed to form the Evangelical Church
Prussian Union of Churches - Wikipedia
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
5,765
#3
The areas that remained Catholic tend to be in southern Germany, and tend to have been part of the Roman Empire and to be less genetically Germanic.

I am not sure if divisions like Franks and Alemans were significant in the 16th century.

Also, many areas that speak German are not mostly Germanic in origin. Similarly, they speak a Germain langauge in the British Isles, but the people are not mostly Germanic. Same with Romance languages, Spanish in Latin America, and Arabic in the near east.
 
Jan 2014
990
Rus
#5
Historically, most of Germany eventually converted to Lutheranism. I know Bavaria (and the Sorbs of course) were the exception. As you may know, the duke, king or emperor established the religion of the area. It wasn't too long after Luther that Calvin and Zwingli arose with their Reformed faith. My mother's ancestors come from Switzerland and the Palatine and they were reformed, eventually worshipping as the German Brethren here in the U.S. The Mennonites and Amish are from this strain. The Reformed denomination gained so many followers in German speaking lands that Frederick eventually combined Lutheranism and Reformed to form the Evangelical Church
Prussian Union of Churches - Wikipedia
Where Reformed were common? Along French/German speaking border, arent they?
 
Jan 2014
990
Rus
#9
I believe they were strong in parts of Prussia as as well, the easter Marches (what is now Poland).
Protestantism in Germany - Wikipedia
The Curious Case of the German Church | Mathew Block
Polish Reformed Church - Wikipedia
I have heard something that Prussian Calvinists have moved from Holland
 
Oct 2013
13,152
Europix
#10
Protestantism was quit strong at a certain moment in France, but as the
Complex image.
So your answer is "no"?
I'd say it is no (sorry :( )

The geographical position wasn't that important. It depended a lot on the relationship State (secular power) and Papacy, on political interests, on type of state, on period.

If You extend a bit the area, You will see that the split Catholics-Protestants exists at Dutch and Hungarian people too. Although in those cases the geographical aspect seems much-much clearer, it's also politics.