Do German Lutherans are predominately of Saxon origin?

Sep 2012
3,510
Bulgaria
#51
Taylor wasn't exactly a Marxist, although he had socialist sympathies, and he was independent-minded and not always predictable in his views, somethimes cranky; his books make very good reading and one can always learn something from them.
Exactly. One should read his introduction for 'The Reichstag Fire' by Fritz Tobias. I am interested in everything involving Dimitrov so i own this book. He is not a Marxist.

http://www.jrbooksonline.com/PDF_Books/Reichstag_Fire.pdf
 

authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
4,896
#52
Only the technology changed dramatically during 1000years, but the inside (soul) remained the same barbarian.
A drawing of a ancient horse mounted warrior and a photo of a nazi era ceremonial parade. In your attempt at proving your hypothesis, you post this. Are you still at school?

BTW, posting messages on my profile as if in some personal plea is unwelcome. Please desist.
 

authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
4,896
#54
Exactly. One should read his introduction for 'The Reichstag Fire' by Fritz Tobias. I am interested in everything involving Dimitrov so i own this book. He is not a Marxist.

http://www.jrbooksonline.com/PDF_Books/Reichstag_Fire.pdf
Just because Dimitrov is not a marxist has no bearing on AJP Taylor whatsover.

If you want to know about Taylor's involvement with Communism, read A.J.P. Taylor revisionism Origins Second World War He was a member of the Communist party between 1924 to 1926. He left because he thought the party should support the General Strike in 1926 which they failed to do. He thought them, poor communists indeed.
 

Linschoten

Ad Honoris
Aug 2010
15,029
Welsh Marches
#55
Like many academic left-wingers, Taylor felt attracted to Marxist politics in the 1930s, but he was not a Marxist ideologue and there is hardly any trace of Marxism in his historical writings (even in his younger years, during which he specialized in Continental diplomatic history). He was quite empirical in his approach. Anyone who expects to find a Marxist line in his books on the Italian problem in European diplomacy or on the Hapsburg Empire 1815-1918 will be severly disappointed, he was really more like Namier.
 
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Likes: authun
Nov 2017
866
Győr
#57
A drawing of a ancient horse mounted warrior and a photo of a nazi era ceremonial parade. In your attempt at proving your hypothesis, you post this. Are you still at school?

BTW, posting messages on my profile as if in some personal plea is unwelcome. Please desist.

his is from the opening of A.J.P. Taylor’s “The Course of German History.” For those of us who worry that recent events suggest the end of Western Civilization it is somewhat reassuring, in that that recent events conform to a familiar pattern, though it’s admittedly a small comfort — like knowing that a suicidal drunk has gone through a cycle like this before…:


“The history of the Germans is the history of extremes. It contains everything except moderation, and in the course of a thousand years the Germans have experienced everything except normality…’German’ has meant at one moment a being so sentimental, so trusting, so pious, as to be too good for this world; and at another a being so brutal, so unprincipled, so degraded, as to be not fit to live. Both descriptions are true…”

The Course of German History, he argued that National Socialism was the inevitable product of the entire history of the Germans going back to the days of the Germanic tribes. He was an early champion of what has since been called the Sonderweg (Special Way) interpretation of German history, that German culture and society developed over the centuries in such a way as to make Nazi Germany inevitable. Moreover, he argued that there was a symbiotic relationship between Hitler and the German people, with Adolf Hitler needing the Germans to fulfil his dreams of conquest and the German people needing Hitler to fulfil their dreams of subjugation of their neighbours. In particular, he accused the Germans of waging an endless Drang nach Osten against their Slavic neighbours since the days of Charlemagne.
 

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