Do most people think you're being political when you talk about history or current events?

Feb 2016
567
ROK
#1
I noticed this with most people outside of this forum. I really don't like to talk politics. I'll talk about current events or history especially if I'm deeply concerned about a current event. The problem is when I express views that contradict the majority around me. People take me the wrong way. The first time was when I expressed my concerns about the war in Iraq many years ago. Only the professor agreed with me. My former classmates probably agree with me now as I haven't met anyone who was happy about that war for a long time. Unfortunately, this was long after I was done with that class and we all went our separate ways. This sort of thing happened again and again with other events after college. Now I realize that it's safer to act ignorant. Just talk about the Kardashians or some nerdy things and pretend nothing is going wrong. I think this was how the people who predicted the 2007-2008 financial crisis felt. From what I experienced, it's possible that they too were heavily ridiculed before the crisis began.
 
Likes: Mikeduke324

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
33,770
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#2
There are some people who are only interested in history as far as it supports current politics.

I'm not one of those people. I'm more than able to talk about history without bringing modern politics or events into it.
 
Feb 2016
567
ROK
#3
Even just talking about history without bringing modern politics or events can bring a lot of misunderstanding in my experience. It's hard to find someone who's into history except for this forum. When I was a high school student, I watched a documentary about how WWII began. The other students assumed that I was a weirdo. Any talk about WWII made them feel uncomfortable. I'm not talking about just history. Right now, my main concerns are the trade wars. Many people around me hate it when I talk about the economy. Only the people who work in international business understand. And that concerns me even more because so many others are unaware and unprepared. Other people who baffle me are the ones who want communism. I've been encountering more and more of them lately. They clearly only read about the ideology and not what happened to a lot of the Communists in the Communist countries. I want to explain it to them, and I know some people who fled a Communist country and I read books, but I'd just end up offending people and get accused of being too political.
 
Last edited:
Mar 2019
1,255
Kansas
#4
There are some people who are only interested in history as far as it supports current politics.

I'm not one of those people. I'm more than able to talk about history without bringing modern politics or events into it.
I will do it if someone is being obnoxious.

For example. Oh our leader is really messing up political crisis xxxxxxxx

I will usually draw on an historical crisis that is similar, but involved their political leader, especially if he looks like he handled it the way the current one is...................just to be annoying lol
 
Jul 2019
107
New Jersey
#5
I listen to lots of history podcasts. Apparently, some ostensibly highly educated people can't understand that a 20 minute long rant about Trump is rather irrelevant to Anglo Saxon England.
 
Jun 2018
130
New York
#6
I keep History and Politics separate most of the time. If i'm talking history it is just that, history. Some facts that I find amusing or interesting. If i'm talking politics or current events with someone it is usually within people I know well. That is a topic I do not like to get into fights about in my everyday life even as I keep a close eye on things.

People who are still alive I will have some sort of opinion on that bleeds into politics. Long dead people I have an opinion on are from a historical viewpoint.

If I was to run into a situation where I am talking history and someone thinks it is political, 50/50 chance I exit the conversation. Sometimes you just want to talk about how cool some medieval event or thing was. Not relate it to something that happened in the last week somehow.
 

Menshevik

Ad Honorem
Dec 2012
9,240
here
#7
Yes, talking about history with the layperson, can often times turn political. In my experience, most historical references with such people result in the conversation going one of two ways:

1. Said reference goes completely over their head. And trying to explain what it is just makes matters worse, more confusing.

2. They have just enough knowledge of the historical reference to paint it in modern political/socio-economic terms. "Oh, you're a fan of __________? You must be a liberal."

"Don't you that that general/conqueror/king that you admire was cruel and racist? You must be a right-winger."
 
Likes: Abraham95
Jun 2017
278
maine
#8
It only happened once (I was trying to give some background history to a Hmong quilt--and he went ballistic). But most people separate the two. Perhaps because--like Martel in #6--I try to stay off living people.
 
Mar 2019
1,255
Kansas
#9
2. They have just enough knowledge of the historical reference to paint it in modern political/socio-economic terms. "Oh, you're a fan of __________? You must be a liberal."

"Don't you that that general/conqueror/king that you admire was cruel and racist? You must be a right-winger."
Yeah, having knowledge of a topic equates to support...........I always remember on a political forum of being pro Israel and pro Arab all in the same thread....always chuckled at that
 
Likes: Menshevik

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