Do we know if North Korea planned to move its capital southward if it would have won the Korean War?

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,286
Dispargum
#11
Supposedly, Kim Il Sung wanted to be buried in the South. When I was assigned to Korea in the 1990s, Kim Sr was still alive but he was an old man. The story was, when he died, the war would restart.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,013
SoCal
#12
Supposedly, Kim Il Sung wanted to be buried in the South.
Where in the South?

When I was assigned to Korea in the 1990s, Kim Sr was still alive but he was an old man. The story was, when he died, the war would restart.
Were you a US soldier?

Also, is that why North Korea began building nukes shortly before his death? Was it hoping to use this as an excuse to fight another war with the US?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,013
SoCal
#13
Hey @Maki, here's another question for you:

In the unlikely event that the US would've withdrawn its troops from Korea under Jimmy Carter and North Korea would have subsequently conquered the South, do you think that NK would have then moved its capital to Seoul? I'm asking because this was already after 1972--and 1972 was when NK officially made Pyongyang its capital.
 

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,390
Republika Srpska
#14
I believe yes, but not immediately.. Seoul has historical significance, so I think NK would have still changed it, but by that point Seoul would have been under "imperialist-capitalist" control for almost 3 decades so I assume the NK leaders would first try to kinda communize it if it makes any sense before officially transfering the capital.
 
Likes: Futurist
Feb 2016
575
ROK
#15
The ironic reason why North lost the Korean war is that the Southern military generals and high ranking officiers were former Japanese collaborators. (Northern ones were independence fighters whose mantra was to bring justice to the collaborators). If North won the war, the fate of the former collaborators would be sure death. In vietnam, high ranking officials in the South were often corrupt, because even if the South fell, at least you are rich. In Korea, if the South fell, you were dead. So there was strong motivation to NOT be corrupt. in China or Vietnam, when the Americans supplied the anticommunists with weapons and supplies, they were sold off to the highest bidder, often the enemy. In Korea, even despite the lower scale and quality of those initial supplies (while NK recieved tanks from the USSR, SK basically got M1 Garands), nothing was wasted.
Readers should take note that many of the pro-independence Koreans moved to or stayed in South Korea, too. And not all of the independence fighters were communists. Koreans (not all of them) were forced into the Japanese military during the later stage of WWII. Most of them really weren't collaborators. Although he became a controversial dictator, the first president of South Korea was actually an independence fighter who later moved to the US and studied there. He became the president of South Korea after the liberation and after an election.

Japanese collaborators weren't the only people whom the North Korean government persecuted. Religious people were also persecuted. Wealthy people (although there weren't many in Korea at that time, and none of them were wealthy in Western standards) were targets, too. When looking at the long term, most of the people whom the NK government persecuted were actually communists who became disillusioned with Kim Il-sung's rule.
 
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Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,013
SoCal
#16
I believe yes, but not immediately.. Seoul has historical significance, so I think NK would have still changed it, but by that point Seoul would have been under "imperialist-capitalist" control for almost 3 decades so I assume the NK leaders would first try to kinda communize it if it makes any sense before officially transfering the capital.
So, roughly a 10-year Communization period?

Also, would Pyongyang have become Korea's second city in this scenario--sort of like how St. Petersburg is viewed by the Russian people?
 

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