Do we know what percentage of Germany's total population moved east during the Ostsiedlung?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,461
SoCal
Do we know what percentage of Germany's total population moved east during the Ostsiedlung?

Looking at a map, the German language zone made significant gains during the Ostsiedlung:



However, I don't know how much of these gains were the result of Germans moving east and how many of these gains were the result of Poles, Old Prussians, Lithuanians, et cetera being Germanized.

Does anyone have any additional information which could shed some light on this?
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,171
US
Applying a percentage to this would be difficult since it happened over hundreds of years.
Not only this but an extensive area as well. In general , one could apply the term Ostsiedlung from lands in present day Romania to Estonia, from the Ukraine to Slovenia.
 
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Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,171
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Do we at least know the total number of Germans who moved east during the Ostsiedlung?
I know in what is present day Poland there were never enough to completely take over. Also, things are complicated by language versus ethnicity. Many Poles were germanized and some Germans were polonized. The key to one's birth ethnicity was usually religion: Catholic or Protestant. Sometimes a person may not have been sure who they were, vacillating in their self identification, as there could be benefits to claiming a particular ethnic or nationality. For example, my ancestors who came from Poland claimed their place of birth, as well as their parents as "Polish German" in the 1900 U.S. Census, as Germany and their native tongue as German in the 1910 U.S. Census and as Poland as heir place of birth and their native tongue as Polish in the 1920 Census. Now were they that confused? They were Catholic s there is little doubt as to what ethnicity they were. In part, who ever gave the information to Census taker, along with the fact that there was "no" Poland in 1910 but there was in 1920 may be reasons for some of these answers. But I believe it was more of a cultural defense. Many Poles first settled in a German neighborhood when they arrived in the U.S. Since they could speak German and their church was likely a German American church, these immigrants took on that complexion. Once they were comfortable in their new land they likely felt confident to express their actual ethnicity.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,461
SoCal
I know in what is present day Poland there were never enough to completely take over. Also, things are complicated by language versus ethnicity. Many Poles were germanized and some Germans were polonized. The key to one's birth ethnicity was usually religion: Catholic or Protestant. Sometimes a person may not have been sure who they were, vacillating in their self identification, as there could be benefits to claiming a particular ethnic or nationality. For example, my ancestors who came from Poland claimed their place of birth, as well as their parents as "Polish German" in the 1900 U.S. Census, as Germany and their native tongue as German in the 1910 U.S. Census and as Poland as heir place of birth and their native tongue as Polish in the 1920 Census. Now were they that confused? They were Catholic s there is little doubt as to what ethnicity they were. In part, who ever gave the information to Census taker, along with the fact that there was "no" Poland in 1910 but there was in 1920 may be reasons for some of these answers. But I believe it was more of a cultural defense. Many Poles first settled in a German neighborhood when they arrived in the U.S. Since they could speak German and their church was likely a German American church, these immigrants took on that complexion. Once they were comfortable in their new land they likely felt confident to express their actual ethnicity.
Very interesting, Roger! Indeed, thanks for sharing this! :)