Do you believe in life after death?

Do you believe in life after death?

  • Yes

    Votes: 83 39.7%
  • No

    Votes: 88 42.1%
  • I don't know

    Votes: 38 18.2%

  • Total voters
    209
Jun 2016
1,760
England, 200 yards from Wales
Our bodies are unquestionably made up of cells. But there is something more there than mere biochemistry et al. Life, Consciousness, name it any way you like. Something not yet fathomed by Science.
Consciousness certainly happens, but that it is an unfathomed something more (if that means other) than biochemistry, rather than a so far unfathomed process of complex biochemistry is debatable.
 

Corvidius

Ad Honorem
Jul 2017
2,551
Crows nest
If we had a soul, were does it come from and when do we acquire it?

Does the soul exist before we are conceived?

If our consciousness is our soul and lives after the death of the body, then the soul in incorporeal. How then does it interface with our physical brain?

Can the soul be killed?

Can animals other than humans have a soul?

Can ET have a soul?

If the answer to the above question is yes, but the answer to the question about non human animals was no, is having a soul dependent on having a certain level of intelligence?

If the answer to the above was yes, then what would this level of intelligence need to be?

Bottlenose dolphins are next down from us in intelligence, maybe, so do they have a soul? If no due to them not being intelligent enough, what if the difference in intelligence between ET and us is far greater than that between us and dolphins, should we then not rate having a soul? what is the benchmark, is it universal or dictated by us on the third rock from the Sun.

If we have a soul, is it released instantly at the point of bodily death? If yes, then arguments about preserving the body are pointless. If no, what does this soul do, lurk in a rotting corpse? Ah, of course, all these rotting corpses rise from the ground at "Judgement Day". So, during this interminable time until the big day, presumably the soul has in fact been lurking in a corpse and has yet to go to Heaven or Hell.
 
Jun 2016
1,760
England, 200 yards from Wales
If we had a soul, were does it come from and when do we acquire it?

Does the soul exist before we are conceived?

If our consciousness is our soul and lives after the death of the body, then the soul in incorporeal. How then does it interface with our physical brain?

Can the soul be killed?

Can animals other than humans have a soul?

Can ET have a soul?

If the answer to the above question is yes, but the answer to the question about non human animals was no, is having a soul dependent on having a certain level of intelligence?

If the answer to the above was yes, then what would this level of intelligence need to be?

Bottlenose dolphins are next down from us in intelligence, maybe, so do they have a soul? If no due to them not being intelligent enough, what if the difference in intelligence between ET and us is far greater than that between us and dolphins, should we then not rate having a soul? what is the benchmark, is it universal or dictated by us on the third rock from the Sun.

If we have a soul, is it released instantly at the point of bodily death? If yes, then arguments about preserving the body are pointless. If no, what does this soul do, lurk in a rotting corpse? Ah, of course, all these rotting corpses rise from the ground at "Judgement Day". So, during this interminable time until the big day, presumably the soul has in fact been lurking in a corpse and has yet to go to Heaven or Hell.
Further to that, if we have a soul and dolphins don't, what about australopithecines or earlier primates? If they didn't at what evolutionary stage did we develop the thing?
 
Likes: Corvidius
Our bodies are unquestionably made up of cells. But there is something more there than mere biochemistry et al. Life, Consciousness, name it any way you like. Something not yet fathomed by Science.
I studied this many years ago and yes life is a strange phenomena of something inanimate becoming animate and more so of the transference of data / information between something so base primitive as cells ............ however.

As strange as that is, it doesn't change the fact that we are not one being, but a collective, if we are a collective then our "soul" has no source, no anchor.

Its like looking at a house and trying to pick a single brick which is the house, its all the house.

At our root, we are DNA but that's just biological information, it is not a being in possession of a soul.

Us thinking we have a soul is just human arrogance, that we individually think we're so important that we must have some sort of immortal soul.
Its understandable, we are programmed for survival, and for us to want to survive we must cherish ourselves and put our being on a pedestal .......... but that doesn't change the math.

The most interesting thing for me is where does the information between cells come from? information can only come from a form of intelligence, how do cells process information?

Studying life at a primordial cellular level is very interesting and something science hasn't yet figured out, at least they hadn't when I looked into it, I doubt anything has changed.
 
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Corvidius

Ad Honorem
Jul 2017
2,551
Crows nest
Further to that, if we have a soul and dolphins don't, what about australopithecines or earlier primates? If they didn't at what evolutionary stage did we develop the thing?
That is a good point, for at what stage do we transition from "dumb animal" to being able to have a soul. Neanderthals buried their dead, surely an indication of at least a rudimentary religion, and it seems that Homo heidelbergensis may have buried their dead. If they had a soul, why not H. erectus. I think an answer lies in the fact that all these ancestors and close cousins were unknown when our direct and far more recent ancestors first had thoughts about who we are and what happens after death. Knowledge and evolution have, I think, killed the soul, or of course greatly expanded the list of those eligible to have a soul. Do the "mourners" at corvid "funerals" have souls, hm.
 

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
25,518
Italy, Lago Maggiore
Technically it's more easy to believe in death after life ...

But "to believe" implies that you don't know. So I have said that I believe in life after death. I don't know ... but I hope. It's natural for a living being to imagine that death is not the end of all.
 
Jun 2016
1,760
England, 200 yards from Wales
That is a good point, for at what stage do we transition from "dumb animal" to being able to have a soul. Neanderthals buried their dead, surely an indication of at least a rudimentary religion, and it seems that Homo heidelbergensis may have buried their dead. If they had a soul, why not H. erectus. I think an answer lies in the fact that all these ancestors and close cousins were unknown when our direct and far more recent ancestors first had thoughts about who we are and what happens after death. Knowledge and evolution have, I think, killed the soul, or of course greatly expanded the list of those eligible to have a soul. Do the "mourners" at corvid "funerals" have souls, hm.
Of course the absence of "ancestors and close cousins" has no doubt contributed to the vision of humans as fundamentally different in kind from other animals. I suppose the absence of these intermediate forms produced the notion of defined species in general, whereas of course in the sea of change over time there are no hard lines. So if us, why not your corvid friends, if them why not earthworms, or amoebas?
 

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