Do you believe in life after death?

Do you believe in life after death?

  • Yes

    Votes: 87 39.9%
  • No

    Votes: 91 41.7%
  • I don't know

    Votes: 40 18.3%

  • Total voters
    218
Status
Closed

Dreamhunter

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
7,503
Malaysia
The cases of some persons remembering their previous lives were mainly based on what facts of their previous lives were accurately cited by these
persons who claimed rebirth. Please do develope a habit of reading. it reduces arrogance and ignorance.
You are branding my position on this as 'arrogance' & 'ignorance'? Why? I can equally do the same to yours, but I'd rather chose not to.

Just because someone claims that they 'were someone else' and/or 'went somewhere' and/or 'did something' in 'a previous life of theirs' does not mean anything at all. Anyone is free to claim anything. Oh yeah. Talk is darn cheap.

As for reading, I do lots of that too. But mind you, it is not only the quantity that counts, but also the quality. And what you make of what you read is important too.
 
Last edited:

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,818
New Delhi, India
The Consciousness, or in other words Self or Soul migrates from one body , after its death, to another body. The concept of rebirth is one of main concepts of Hinduism / Buddhism and Jainism.
Buddhism had a different kind of re-birth, but people in earlier ages had many beliefs which do not now stand in the light of science. It is your choice if you still choose to believe in them or reject them. Hinduism also has 'advaita', in which there is no creation, no dissolution, no birth, no death. :)
 

Cepheus

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
2,344
P1 Well, Dream hunter equated Consciousness with biochemistry. P2 That never can make sense.
P1 verbal ambiguity, invalid contrast: red flag for weak argument, red flags for dishonest argumentation

P2 unsubstantiated claim: logic error affirming the consequent (previous antecedent distortion posited as true) / affirming distortions: red flag for a weak argument
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Kamayani

Cepheus

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
2,344
P1 Alzheimer's disease or being brain dead is a condition of the brain. P2 The human brain is a cognitive tool which the human Consciousness employs for dealing with reality. P3 When the tool is out of order, Consciousness cannot work.
P1 valid statement

P2 unsubstantiated claim: belief claim asserted as fact

P3 affirming the consequent (if P2 is correct then P3 must be correct): logic error: red flag for weak argumentation
 
  • Like
Reactions: Kamayani

Asherman

Forum Staff
May 2013
3,412
Albuquerque, NM
As most of you probably know I'm a Soto Sect Zen Buddhist, worked on a PhD in Oriental Philosophy & Religion, and have lived most of my life as a Lay Buddhist Householder. "Please ask a Buddhist?"

Well, that depends on which Buddhist you ask and the where/when the question is posed, so my thoughts on the subject are not universal among Buddhists. The earliest texts are from the Theravada Pali texts which are the oldest record we have of what the Buddha taught. The texts date from about a hundred years after the Great Decease, while the Sanskrit texts of Mahayana are more a product of Buddhist thought that came later ... largely as a result of Buddhist Universities like Nalanda. Today, most Buddhists are of the Mahayana School which are further sub-divided into Tantric (Nepal, Tibet, Mustang, etc.), Zen (S. China, Japan, etc., and the largest group that follow teachings that seem to me very far from Buddhism's beginnings. Oh well. The Tantrics are Buddhism laid over the Demon/Spirit native religion of the area. One dies and spends time within the Bardo World where the residual effects of our life choices and behavior are tested. Almost everyone fails, falls into ever increasing fearful illusions, and then is reborn to try again. Reincarnation, a principle feature of Hinduism long before the the 6th century BCE when the Buddha began his ministry at the Deer Park in Northern India, is also a central element in most other Mahayana Schools though much less so in Chan/Zen.

In the Theravada Texts, the Buddha almost invariably avoided the question of "what happens after a person dies". Rather than worry over the end of life, the Teaching centered on how to deal with the central problem of suffering in This life. The "road-map" laid out by the Buddha as he spread his message across Northern India, made each of us responsible for our own struggle with Suffering. It was a very strict discipline, even if called "The Middle Way", and required a level of focus that only a few could follow. Look to the Eight-Fold Path, which is sorta like the Ten Commandments. The Buddha in his life-time provided additional commentary defining the meanings of each of the Eight "commandments" that provided later Buddhist thinkers fodder for transforming Buddhism into a popular religious movement that we know today. Buddhist clergy of most of today's schools/sects also strictly follow over 200 more teachings of Buddhist discipline, beyond those expected of laymen.

Mahayana Lay Buddhists who haven't the time, inclination or opportunities to become a Monk, or priest can hope for release in some future life/existence by following Buddhist Teachings to the best of their ability and by supporting the Monks/Priests who devote their entire lives to making that possible by their own devotions and discipline. Zen is the most notable exception, and only just barely. American Soto congregations of our home temple in LA has pews for folks to sit while singing Buddhist Hymns while the children attend Sunday School. Away from the larger congregation a few join the Monks in a more traditional Zendo where sitting meditation (Zazen), chanting and other traditional forms are continued. Attending my grand daughters graduation from USC this last May, my youngest son came with me to the Temple for a visit. Of course all of the Monks and Priests we knew over 25 years ago are gone, but several of the old congregation still live and one old lady ... a very advanced person in the Dharma was sitting Zazen along with five Anglos ... more than were in the entire congregation when last I was at temple. Progress is being made, I think toward the growth and development of a truly American Buddhist community. BTW, the primary Soto Temple in the US is still in San Francisco where I was an Buddhist Student and follower of Roshi Suzuki way back at the beginning of the 1960s ... before meeting my wife who took me by the collar and moved me from "monastery" to Commune before I could blink.

From my perspective things like what happens after death are more of a distraction from the discipline of overcoming suffering than even marginally worth the effort. As a follower of Zen I'm technically a Mahayana Buddhist, but in actuality my guideposts are the Theravada Texts, but with major effort given to sitting meditation, Zazen. Meditation is continual whether sitting or walking, or buying a pound of hamburger. It becomes a part of one's life and should be seamless, but that is clearly impossible even inside the strictest monastic communities. Living in the Lay World, one is constantly challenged to practice the fundamental concepts we find in the Buddha's Teachings. Our mission: reduce the Suffering in the world as we find and experience it. Recognize that civility, humility, and all the other virtues fall short of what the Buddha, or Bodhisattva(s), tell us we are capable of. We are captured by our perceptive illusions, of craving and wrongful notions about the nature of Reality. Mahayana Buddhism has been essential to the spread of Buddhism and its prescription for "curing" Suffering, but in my belief it is still flawed as mostly interpretations developed long after The Great Decease.

Questions? This will be on the Mid-terms.
 

Cepheus

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
2,344
T

P1 The cases of some persons remembering their previous lives were mainly based on what facts of their previous lives were accurately cited by these
persons who claimed rebirth. P2 Please do develope a habit of reading. P3 it reduces arrogance and ignorance.
P1 unsubstantiated claims: beliefs posited as "facts": red flag for weak argument, red flag for proselytizing / opinion conversion tactic

P2 insulting insinuations, possibly ad hominem to bolster unsubstantiated claims: red flag for weak argument

P3 insulting intimations embedded in the comments: red flag for weak argument
 

Cepheus

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
2,344
Souls can reside in non-human living beings, too, whether animals or plants or microbes. And as the literature says" Like sparks bursting forth from a fire which ascend and then go out and fall back into the fire as ashes, we are all born, live and die and are reborn." Maths of souls is not a problem for God, I think.
We certainly do not want to attack someone beliefs, but then, OTOH, a person's belief should not be used in an argument as if it were a fact.

It is best to make sure the distinctions between faith and facts are always clear.

Your answer here makes perfect sense because it is in response to a question on your beliefs. It is IMO a description of your understanding in regard to the issue in play.
 
Last edited:
Status
Closed