Do you believe in life after death?

Do you believe in life after death?

  • Yes

    Votes: 87 39.9%
  • No

    Votes: 91 41.7%
  • I don't know

    Votes: 40 18.3%

  • Total voters
    218
Status
Closed
Apr 2019
410
India
@Kamayani,
The Yajurveda does contain a reference to rebirth. I am quoting from a book entitled ' The secret teachings of the Vedas ' by Stephen Knapp, published by Jaico Publishing House, India, ISBN 81-7224-091-0 page 139.
Yajurveda 12.36--39
" O learned and tolerant soul, after roaming in waters and plants, thou enterest the womb and are born again and again.---- "
Of course, there are many references to rebirth in the somewhat later literature of the Upanishads and the Puranas.
Verse should be understood with proper translation and proper context.

Concept of re-birth was not even developed in Mahabharata's era. Although we find a few interpolated instances of re-birth in present extant version. But overall it was all about attaining heaven and all of people(both heroes or villains) go to same heaven.
 
Apr 2019
410
India
IMHO, no. Though Zoroastrianism and Vedic religion arose from the same culture, they have too many things common, e.g., Soma/Haoma, Sacred thread, Yajna/Yazata, etc. (Even Asuras and Daevas, the Athravan priests). Buddhism and Jainism arose mainly out of the Indigenous religious thought. Since by then, Sanskrit was the language of religious discourse and had percolated even to the villages, so the religious terms in Pali and Prakrit are derived from Sanskrit.
It seems like back in antiquity Zoroastrianism had an antagonistic relationship with Vedic religion. Iranic people mixed a lot of old middle-eastern elements in their religion.
I don't think 'shramanic' religions have an independent origin from vedics. In fact there are no clear boundaries between different Indian schools of thought. All of these disciplines have been heavily influenced by each-other.
 
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Dreamhunter

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
7,550
Malaysia
Yeah, they cannot all be true, but people have their explanations. It makes a grand topic for discussion and that is what we have been doing for thousands of years. :)
Perhaps we could try to consider religion, each & every religion, whether simple or sophisticated, whether disorganised or organised, as essentially a certain society's ancient form of 'science' - evolved gradually to a certain degree - in the sense that every one of them basically represented an attempt by an early culture or civilisation to make some sense of the broader Universe around them as they understood it, and to fit themselves collectively into that Universe, to the best of the knowledge & wisdom available to them at that particular time.

So, because they did not yet have the benefit of a well structured & well organised evidence based scientific system at the time, they had to resort to their own ways of logic & reasoning, always depending heavily on the wisest, most learned, most charismatic or most thought-capable of men among them, who then also often (but not always) happened to be men of the priestly class among them.

Those guys then naturally made liberal use of stuff like myths, folk tales & legends from times even earlier than them - spin, exaggeration, aggrandisement etc. being justified devices - so as to secure the maximum possible buy-in from the community.
 
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Apr 2019
410
India
My position is that of Hindu spiritualism, I have already stated it. Consciousness or a sense of Self or the Self/Soul itself is an independent entity. It does not emerge out of the brain. It can migrate from one dead body to another womb. Transmigration of souls is one of important tenets of Hindu spiritualism. Rebirth cases have been examined and found trustworthy. Detachment of Consciousness from the body
happens during NDE.

But then why do we don't have such concepts in Vedas?
Since Vedas are considered 'highest' authority in orthodox Hinduism, your point of view needs to align with them.
Isn't it?
 
Feb 2019
670
Thrace
My position is that of Hindu spiritualism, I have already stated it. Consciousness or a sense of Self or the Self/Soul itself is an independent entity. It does not emerge out of the brain. It can migrate from one dead body to another womb. Transmigration of souls is one of important tenets of Hindu spiritualism. Rebirth cases have been examined and found trustworthy. Detachment of Consciousness from the body
happens during NDE.
That most certainly isn't true. Otherwise the person who made such scientific progress would be showered with Nobel prizes.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,921
New Delhi, India
It seems like back in antiquity Zoroastrianism had an antagonistic relationship with Vedic religion. Iranic people mixed a lot of old middle-eastern elements in their religion.
Yeah. It came with a new 'One God' idea whereas the pre-Vedic religion had many Gods and Goddesses. So Zoroaster was in competition with the pre-Vedic religion. Actually, it was one of the first four demands that he made to King Vistaspa, that the Kavis (poets, makers of Richas) should be killed. And when Zoroastrianism came to Iran, it got mixed with many other views and developed in its own way. But still the language, rituals, and myths remained much the same.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,921
New Delhi, India
- so as to secure the maximum possible buy-in from the community.
Not always that. It benefited the society of their time, like the concept of 'dharma' in Indian religions. Even Gods were subserviant to that. That is why the exile of pregnant Mother Sita's is considered bad by most people, and the instigation of Yudhisthira by Krishna to say that 'Ashwatthama is dead' during Mahabharata was was not considered gentlemanly. Many other examples - The killing of Bali by Rama or lifting of the chariot wheel by Krishna against Bhishma after promising that he would not take part in the war.

Krishna picking up the chariot wheel, Bali Killing, Sita's exile (by Raja Ravi Verma of Kerala)
SitaVanavasa.jpeg
 
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Linschoten

Ad Honoris
Aug 2010
16,415
Welsh Marches
Cases of deja vu being passed off as rebirth. How gullible.
There is actually quite cogent evidence for reincarantion, it is a wonder to me people reject it in this way without even bothering to examine it. One might point to the researches of Dr Ian Stevenson of the University of Virginia. Article by someone who is not naturallly inclined to accept such ideas:

Ian Stevenson’s Case for the Afterlife: Are We ‘Skeptics’ Really Just Cynics?

One of his books is available for free download here:

http://www.futureofmankind.co.uk/w/images/1/1b/Twenty_Cases_Suggestive_of_Reincarnation.pdf

A brief talk by Stevenson:

About the rearch methods of Stevenson and his successors:


From an old documentary regarding an Australian case;
 
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Status
Closed