Do you feel any strong cultural attachment to a country that isn't your own or where you were born?

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,351
Sydney
#43
Koreans from the South , by a large majority
met some northerners in Vladivostok , they were pretty much the same type
solid , direct , contact is easy
 
Likes: Futurist

Belgarion

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,624
Australia
#44
Be forewarned ... that the following is rather long and ridiculous! (But applicable to the topic.)...............

.................. perhaps it really was just an inescapably American vision of Britishness anyway ... but I am rather concerned that if I were to go to say, Whitby or Tintagel or pretty much anywhere rural... I probably would never want to go home and never feel 'at home' at home again.
I take it you have not visited Britain Niobe? It is a great place and I used to enjoy visitng very much, but in some respects the reality may surprise and disappoint you. Nevertheless, you should go to see how the ideal compares with the reality, even if it doesn't match your expectations it would be worthwhile.
 
Likes: Futurist
Feb 2019
19
Laniakea Supercluster
#45
I’m from the United States but I’ve never considered myself American or was proud to be an American. When we would have to do the pledge of allegiance in school I would always get mad and say “I’m not even American, I’m Portuguese.” I did that up until 1st grade. All my ancestors (as far as I know) are Portuguese, besides my great grandma, who’s from Brazil. My mom’s side is from the Azores (though she was born here) her parents were born there. My dad’s side is from continental northern Portugal, which was where he was born. My Brazilian great grandma is my mom’s dad’s mom. My mom’s parents owned the apartment I lived in (and still live in) and they live downstairs so I always stayed there when my mom went to work and I would speak a mixture between Portuguese and English. I had a Portuguese accent until I was 5 maybe. I was never around typical Americans so I never identified myself with them. I still identify with it.
I also have a connection with Polynesian culture, none of my ancestors come from there, but I just find it so beautiful and interesting. I started to get interested in it when I saw the movie Moana, I just assumed it was in Hawaii at first but then I researched that more. I thought the culture in it seemed really interesting so I researched that to and I just fell in love with it. I find Polynesian languages the most beautiful in the world (in my opinion), and the traditional clothing and music and art so beautiful. I really like Polynesian tattoos too. I want to live in Polynesia one day, I’ve never been though so I’ll go one day and maybe I won’t like it and I won’t move there.
I also feel connected to Chinese culture, when we would read stories set in China or stories having to do with Chinese mythology when I was in elementary school I was just so interested by it. I always loved the architecture and the mythology and the clothing and the art (as you can see in my profile picture). My favorite cultures are probably a tie between Polynesian (though Polynesian is more a group of very closely related cultures, but I like them all) and Chinese.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,351
Sydney
#50
What I love about Australia is that locals love themselves more than the glittering past
one is what one is.... now , not some fabricated cardboard image
the past can be a burden

Aussie have a devastatingly depreciating sense of humor ,
in an apocalyptic disaster , I'd rather be with Aussies than any others ,
they just handle catastrophe rather well and do what need doing without a fuss