Do you feel any strong cultural attachment to a country that isn't your own or where you were born?

macon

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
4,039
Slovenia, EU
#51
Other parts of Yugoslavia, especially Croatia and Serbia and all Russian because my wife is a Russian. I also admire lots of things from USA, I feel strongly culturally connected to USA through rock music, comics and film.
 
May 2018
126
Houston, TX
#53
I am an American. I had always admired England and the UK. And I got to live and work for three years in the 1990's in northeast England. I felt I had come home. I enjoyed those years as some of the best of my life. The people, the culture, the countryside, (English) football, even the food. I have such a nostalgia for those years. And, like others, when I see recent films like Battle of Britain, Dunkirk, Darkest Hour, etc., I do find myself tearing up. I was there for the 50th anniversary of VE day; went to a concert with a genuine Spitfire flyover; chills. Singing Land of Hope and Glory.

I am quite patriotic for the U.S., but England was special. So, that is my cultural attachment.
 
Likes: dreuxeng

arkteia

Ad Honorem
Nov 2012
4,723
Seattle
#54
Since childhood, I was so interested in Greek history, that I always felt I must have lived there in my "previous" life. So we went to Greece, and I loved it, but felt no "familiar stir" in my chest. I even made husband drive to Sparta, in the attempt to catch that feeling, and felt nothing. But I still loved it.
The only episode of "I was here" feeling happened in Samarkand, next to Ulugbek's observatory. It was not a deja vu, just the feeling of "remembering". So I guess I am somehow connected to Uzbekistan, although I shall never find out in what way.
I think I have traveled some; in Europe, my favorite country is Germany, in any townlet one can find a beautiful museum there. I also loved Australia, and New Zealand, too.
And as many, I enjoyed South Korea, felt mutual understanding with people of China because of similar communist past, and loved Bangkok, the beauty of its people, its Buddhist temples, and its wonderful seafood. Traveling in Asia is very interesting.
 

arkteia

Ad Honorem
Nov 2012
4,723
Seattle
#55
What I love about Australia is that locals love themselves more than the glittering past
one is what one is.... now , not some fabricated cardboard image
the past can be a burden

Aussie have a devastatingly depreciating sense of humor ,
in an apocalyptic disaster , I'd rather be with Aussies than any others ,
they just handle catastrophe rather well and do what need doing without a fuss
Yes. They do. Very dry humor, too, and I suspect they got it from Brits.

But one has to be careful with them. All of a sudden, into that fine, polite, dry humor, there cuts in something unbelievably ribald, pronounced in this thick Australian accent. It is now what they say, it is this sudden change that is so hilarious.
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,851
Western Eurasia
#56
Since childhood, I was so interested in Greek history, that I always felt I must have lived there in my "previous" life. So we went to Greece, and I loved it, but felt no "familiar stir" in my chest. I even made husband drive to Sparta, in the attempt to catch that feeling, and felt nothing. But I still loved it.
The only episode of "I was here" feeling happened in Samarkand, next to Ulugbek's observatory. It was not a deja vu, just the feeling of "remembering". So I guess I am somehow connected to Uzbekistan, although I shall never find out in what way.
I think I have traveled some; in Europe, my favorite country is Germany, in any townlet one can find a beautiful museum there. I also loved Australia, and New Zealand, too.
And as many, I enjoyed South Korea, felt mutual understanding with people of China because of similar communist past, and loved Bangkok, the beauty of its people, its Buddhist temples, and its wonderful seafood. Traveling in Asia is very interesting.
If you don't mind me asking, did you visit Uzbekistan in the SU or post-Soviet period? Just wondering, i have great interest in Central Asia, but i don't know how tourist friendly is the country. There are so many famous historical cities and monuments there, but i don't know how "paranoid" is the regime, can a foreign tourist travel across the country freely on its own or not, are there restrictions on their movements?
 
Likes: Futurist
Nov 2015
1,925
Kyiv
#57
For me the answer to this question seems to be simple. I am Ukrainian, born in Kiev all my relatives by my father are from Kiev places, and by mothers are from the south of Ukraine, where my grandfather's ancestors were among the earliest Ukrainian migrants to this steppe region. And my country is Ukraine, and I live with her joys and her problems.

On the other hand, a piece of my heart remained in Poland, where I lived for the first 7 years, and in Germany, where I lived in the Russian garrison for another 5 years when I was in school (Allstedt and Grossenhain). And as a child I
also lived for 5 years in Belarus, and she is also close to me. After graduating from the Aviation Institute in Kiev, I was sent to work to Western Siberia, in the old Russian city of Tyumen. At that time, graduates of Soviet universities were supposed to work out 3 years there, where the country sent them. And I lived in Tyumen for 5 years and I recognized the Russian outback well. At the same time, I managed to fly around half of that big country on business trips to which the planes I worked as an engineer flew — from Chukotka and the Tyumen Polar Region to Tashkent and the Kola Peninsula.

And since I grew up in a Russified Ukrainian family (my father was a fighter pilot) in Russian garrisons, Russia should have been very close to me. But it is not. While I lived there, I began to feel that I was Ukrainian. Russia is a very unusual country, unlike any other country. Sometimes it seemed to me there that I live in the 19th century - the customs of the local people were such archaic. It turned out to be completely different from what it seemed from afar. I have never regretted that I lived there for 5 years - everything there was unusual and surreal and interesting. And I never regretted that after 5 years I returned to Kiev, where I live now.

And England is also close to me, and I grew up on English rock - and on music that broadcasted the Radio Luxembourg. And then I had a business with the British. And when my son flew there this winter for the winter holidays - he also liked England very much. I also like Thailand - I felt like at home. And I like Tashkent - I flew there on official business many times (in Tashkent they made our IL-76, for which I worked), and it was a city without problems, and the people there were light and friendly.

I wrote a 600-page book about all this with lots of intersting stories and there are a lot of pictures in it. Basically these are my photos of those years. In a month it will be released in print. This book is in Russian.
 
Likes: arkteia
Apr 2014
390
Istanbul Turkey
#58
I always liked and admired UK. Since childhood I grew up British literature from child and boys own stories to 19th century literure and especially British history.
 

arkteia

Ad Honorem
Nov 2012
4,723
Seattle
#59
If you don't mind me asking, did you visit Uzbekistan in the SU or post-Soviet period? Just wondering, i have great interest in Central Asia, but i don't know how tourist friendly is the country. There are so many famous historical cities and monuments there, but i don't know how "paranoid" is the regime, can a foreign tourist travel across the country freely on its own or not, are there restrictions on their movements?
In the Soviet time, twice. One of my Russian relatives lived in Tashkent. And the second time it was shortly before the collapse of the SU.

My feeling is, Uzbeks are probably the most friendly in Central Asia. I would go now without reservation, but it is me. But for a foreigner it is probably easier to go with a tour and visit Samarkand, Urgench, Khiva, Bukhara, all these ancient cities. The best time to go is when “Uruk” (the peach tree) blossoms.

There is a strange mismatch between their hospitality and poor sanitary conditions. I would definitely take Ciprofloxacin or something along these lines if I travel there.

I don’t know about paranoia, I may ask my relatives but it will be only in the summer.
 
Likes: Tulun