Do you feel any strong cultural attachment to a country that isn't your own or where you were born?

arkteia

Ad Honorem
Nov 2012
4,723
Seattle
If you don't mind me asking, did you visit Uzbekistan in the SU or post-Soviet period? Just wondering, i have great interest in Central Asia, but i don't know how tourist friendly is the country. There are so many famous historical cities and monuments there, but i don't know how "paranoid" is the regime, can a foreign tourist travel across the country freely on its own or not, are there restrictions on their movements?
Actually, I asked a person who emigrated from a neighboring country much later than myself. And being the “local”, he understands them better.

First, he said it would be pretty safe to travel there. He explained it differently. In his view, both Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan had more cultural ties with Russia, and it still shows positively, he said. Plus, “they like tourists”. No paranoia, he said.

P.S. it would probably be very interesting to travel to Uzbekistan and Khazakhstan, and then, if you want to see different Islamic parts of the former SU, fly to Baku. Baku is pretty safe and well- off (oil). The contrast between the old and the new is interesting. Plus, they have mansions that remained from the oil barons of the early XX century.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,750
SoCal
If you don't mind me asking, did you visit Uzbekistan in the SU or post-Soviet period? Just wondering, i have great interest in Central Asia, but i don't know how tourist friendly is the country. There are so many famous historical cities and monuments there, but i don't know how "paranoid" is the regime, can a foreign tourist travel across the country freely on its own or not, are there restrictions on their movements?
For what it's worth, I have read that the new Uzbek government (2016 and beyond) is more reformist and modernist than Islam Karimov's government was (Karimov died in 2016).
 
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Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,899
Western Eurasia
Actually, I asked a person who emigrated from a neighboring country much later than myself. And being the “local”, he understands them better.

First, he said it would be pretty safe to travel there. He explained it differently. In his view, both Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan had more cultural ties with Russia, and it still shows positively, he said. Plus, “they like tourists”. No paranoia, he said.

P.S. it would probably be very interesting to travel to Uzbekistan and Khazakhstan, and then, if you want to see different Islamic parts of the former SU, fly to Baku. Baku is pretty safe and well- off (oil). The contrast between the old and the new is interesting. Plus, they have mansions that remained from the oil barons of the early XX century.
Thanks for the tips. Kazakhstan is visa free for my country, there are even cheap flights to Astana, though its capital doesn't interest me (just a modern city), but i think it has some medieval historical sites too in the south of the country, such as the famous mystic Ahmed Yesevi's mausoleum. Kazakhstan seems to be a good starting point for a Central Asia tour. I would also like to visit Kirgizistan for its nature (i'm from a relatively plain country, so love huge mountains :D )and from there travelling to Uzbekistan for her historical sites. About Kirgizistan i have heard a lot of positive feedback, EU cizitens can travel there freely since years and it is said to be extremely cheap once you are there, but in case of Uzbekistan i was wondering, the visa regime was lifted just very recently (february this year) and i remember there used to be problems some years ago around the Fergana valley and the Kirgiz border in particular, also the few Uzbek expats i've met had a rather negative opinion about the state of affairs in the country (but that was years ago) that is why i was wondering. The Caucasus would be another journey, I'm also very interested in Georgia and Azerbaijan (but i wait until Azerbaijan lifts the visa obligation for us...).
 
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Aug 2012
1,554
The USA springs to mind. Not because of the entertainment aspects of her culture - which by themselves have been a huge aspect of America's success as a civilization - but because to me the manner of their government makes them the heirs of the old Romans. I have a great respect for their political system, their distrust of autocracy, the failsafes they put in place to ensure no one man grew greater than their Republic. They should be very proud of their Founding Fathers, because they clearly had a lot of wisdom between them.
 
Mar 2016
1,222
Australia
The USA springs to mind. Not because of the entertainment aspects of her culture - which by themselves have been a huge aspect of America's success as a civilization - but because to me the manner of their government makes them the heirs of the old Romans. I have a great respect for their political system, their distrust of autocracy, the failsafes they put in place to ensure no one man grew greater than their Republic. They should be very proud of their Founding Fathers, because they clearly had a lot of wisdom between them.
As much as one can criticise the US for aspects of its politics, one thing I can never deny is how admirable their devotion to defending their rights in the Constitution and Bill of Rights is (mostly). While the West is seeing an increasingly encroachment of the rights of freedom of speech and privacy, the US still defends these rights vigorously and refuses to compromise them whatsoever, which I think is a noble thing to do.