Do you, on average, consider the collapse of the USSR to be more of a good thing or more of a bad thing?

Do you, on average, consider the collapse of the USSR to be more of a good thing or a bad thing?

  • More of a good thing

  • More of a bad thing


Results are only viewable after voting.

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,131
SoCal
#11
I am not sure, but i recall that the options were : preserve the USSR in a somewhat different form or as it is. So, maybe the outcome was not what the people really, really wanted.
As I understood it, a No vote meant a vote in favor of independence. That's why Galicia overwhelmingly voted No. If No means preserving the status quo in the Soviet Union, then obviously Galicia would have voted Yes as the lesser of the two evils.
 
Oct 2012
676
#12
As I understood it, a No vote meant a vote in favor of independence. That's why Galicia overwhelmingly voted No. If No means preserving the status quo in the Soviet Union, then obviously Galicia would have voted Yes as the lesser of the two evils.
Maybe, I am not sure. I think there were additional options in Ukraine for example. (full independence?) But as I said, not sure about that. As I recall the whole referendum was quite confusing, people were not really sure what they were voting for and what the options really were.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,131
SoCal
#13
Maybe, I am not sure. I think there were additional options in Ukraine for example. (full independence?) But as I said, not sure about that. As I recall the whole referendum was quite confusing, people were not really sure what they were voting for and what the options really were.
The options for full independence were only in Galicia. In any case, voting for full independence was pointless since it was never going to win a majority in Ukraine due to it not being on the ballot in enough parts of Ukraine in March 1991.

Also, Volhynia and Kiev likewise had a lot of votes for the No side (in Kiev, they were even a slight majority) in March 1991 even though they didn't have the option of full independence like Galicia had.
 
Oct 2016
1,144
Merryland
#14
agree with Sam-Nary and Talbot. the USSR was a monstrosity and the world was/is better off without.
I do concede that it probably took a tyranny to hold things together to beat Hitler, but that was the only positive. would have been great if Stalin had died in spring 1945 and they dissolved right then.

(note; I accidentally voted 'no', misread the question, but the USSR dissolution was definitely a good thing)
 
Feb 2014
314
Miami
#15
Bad due to leaving one out of control hegemony which has lead to several catastrophic wars as compared to two competitors throwing money at small nations to make each of their systems seem more superior. Now we have a hammer nation causing mass mayhem
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,851
Western Eurasia
#16
voted "more of a good thing", it is good that it no longer exist, but wish the wild 90s transition happened somehow differently, more wisely. But admittedly I don't know what would be the ideal process, preventing the old nomenklatura to preserve its power and influence into the capitalist system? or was it inevitable that they survive? or it would be even worser, more chaotic without them? :rolleyes:
Nevertheless I can also emphatize with the "small people" of the early 90s who were shocked, suddenly lost the social security and found themselves in a hopeless economic situation.
 
Jun 2019
61
St.Petersburg
#17
This became inevitable as soon as the strong hand above disappeared. Now it is impossible to imagine that such countries as Turkmenistan and Estonia existed in a formally unified legal space. Moreover, the collapse of empires and ethnic self-determination are a general trend of the 20th century, the USSR was only a little late on this way.
P.S. From my point of view it was very positive event, despite all the problems that arose. Fortunately, the Yugoslav scenario was avoided. Attempts to preserve the union would lead to a similar result.
 
Last edited:
Jun 2019
61
St.Petersburg
#19
USSR should have evolve itself as a federation. The economic cost of the breakup was too much pinching for all republics.
The reasons for the collapse of the USSR were largely ethnic, although the economic collapse, of course, sped things up. Economic losses are not as great as it seems, profitable ties are preserved, disadvantageous ones are torn. Even Russia and Ukraine currently have rather active trade, although this looks strange when viewing news feeds.
 

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