Do you really want to live forever?

Dec 2011
2,160
#61
Living forever....
if I didnt age and was also unkillable, it might be interesting to see the world change.
But if I could be killed it might not be worth it. Dying peacefully aged 78 might be better than dying horrible aged 25,000 when the world ends. What use were those 25 000 years then.
And the longer I live the more chances of being maimed in accidents increases. My first 1000 years might be normal but what if I’m blinded, crippled, emasculated, deafened or left irredeemably ugly from some disaster. How difficult will the next 40 000 years be!!

Am I sterile? Breeding causes problems. I might have half the planet bring my decendents by the time the world ends.

What meaningful existence could I have in a life that has no end. Ennui and disinterest would become a curse. There would always be a tomorrow. Tens of thousands of friends would die. Watching my child and grandchildren grow old and die before doesn’t not seem like a pleasent time.

No. I’d take bowing out aged 120 provinding the aging process from 60-120 could be slowed. Aged 119 I’d better be able to walk/talk/see and wipe my own arse.
The way I see it, the only way you or I will be able to live beyond 130 will be by advances in medical knowledge. Eventually there will be a full understanding of how the human body (and mind) works. I am very doubtful if this will happen in my lifetime, but the question being discussed here is, assuming there were such medical breakthroughs enabling us to live forever, would we want to? My answer is yes, I would, though I prefer the word "indefinitely" rather than forever - I want to be able to die, at any time I really want to.

Of course, all diseases will have cures by then. Along with such medical advances, I assume that humanity will solve the (relatively small) problems of safety. For example, cars will become controlled by AI, which will have been honed to be far safer than human drivers (in fact so safe that an accident becomes a virtual impossibility, and even if one does occur, safety system such as air bags will render them inconsequential), and furthermore the roads will have CCTV which will warn pedestrians of cars coming so that they never step out in front of them. Geology will have progressed to the point where we know where and when earthquakes and volcanoes will occur, so no-one will have to because of them. Asteroids will be spotted and blasted apart decades before they might pose any danger to people on Earth.

If all people have available the medical technology to live forever, then your family and friends will also be with you. Friendship is a great consolation as you get older, meeting and talking to people you trust, and finding out what they are doing, is always interesting. But beyond that, I am happy to live forever because, just as an example, there are so many books to read and films to watch. In fact, the production of these things is going up exponentially, so that even living forever will not give me enough time to enjoy them all!

All the necessities of life will be provided for free, because they will be produced by robots. There will be useful work to do, but work is a good thing, provided it is not oppressive. I envisage work occupying a few days a week, but with time off for extensive holidays.

Of course, if everyone on the planet doesn't die, there will be the huge problem of overpopulation. On the other hand, even if the elixir of youth was found tomorrow, and given to everyone immediately, that would mean 56 million extra people each year, who would otherwise have died. That isn't so very much considering that it would take about 20 years to add a billion, when the population is already nearly 8 billion. More realistically, let's say medical advances reach a point in 20 years time when it is feasible to keep people alive beyond 130, though the medicines will at first be expensive. In another decade or two such medicines begin to become more widely available. Governments should by then have worked out some policy whereby those who want to take the medicine must sign to say that they won't have more than two (or even one) children. At this stage, I think that some old people will, despite having the elixir available, decide they have had enough of life and choose not to take it. In this way I don't think death will disappear, so people will be able to have children without the population going up.

It's obviously very hard to predict centuries ahead, but I speculate things like colonising Mars, or setting up virtual realities that people can live in, or making cities on the sea, or getting robots to make huge colonies in space, will make enough room for a much bigger population to live.
 
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Likes: Ken Sableng
Mar 2019
8
East Indies
#62
The joy of being the solemn observer of the world's events, watching history be written in books, learning about everything that is, seeing what is perceived as "the future" by the people you've long passed by would be insurmountable.

Personally, i think people overly dramatizes about the death of the loved ones. I myself have lost someone endearing to me a few years back and i can assure you that the grieve only lasted for a few days or weeks. Less than a month later i'd already be up and about normally, almost as if their death never happened.

By no means do i meant to desecrate the idea of mourning people close to your heart when they die. It's just that i want to remind us all that people could easily forgot, even if it is the most important thing to them.
 
Jan 2019
130
USA
#63
You have to wonder what effect living forever would have on our ability to learn. Assuming we don't have any biological degradation due to old age. Would a person who lives forever eventually become the most intelligent person in the world?

Either way.. yeah, I wouldn't want to live forever. I don't want to see everyone I love pass away around me.
 
Dec 2011
2,160
#64
The joy of being the solemn observer of the world's events, watching history be written in books, learning about everything that is, seeing what is perceived as "the future" by the people you've long passed by would be insurmountable.

Personally, i think people overly dramatizes about the death of the loved ones. I myself have lost someone endearing to me a few years back and i can assure you that the grieve only lasted for a few days or weeks. Less than a month later i'd already be up and about normally, almost as if their death never happened.

By no means do i meant to desecrate the idea of mourning people close to your heart when they die. It's just that i want to remind us all that people could easily forgot, even if it is the most important thing to them.
I don't understand the point you are making. We are discussing whether each of us would like to live forever, not whether we would like our loved ones to live forever.
 
Dec 2011
2,160
#65
You have to wonder what effect living forever would have on our ability to learn. Assuming we don't have any biological degradation due to old age. Would a person who lives forever eventually become the most intelligent person in the world?

Either way.. yeah, I wouldn't want to live forever. I don't want to see everyone I love pass away around me.
There has to be a limit to our brain capacity, and as I get older I do feel my brain is getting "full". But I can function well enough mentally, just so long as there is no real deterioration; I assume that one premise of this discussion that we live forever with our bodies and brains intact.

Another premise I assume is that the chance to live forever is made generally available (it isn't being suggested that only Bobbaloo gets it) so your friends should remain with you.
 
Mar 2019
8
East Indies
#66
I don't understand the point you are making. We are discussing whether each of us would like to live forever, not whether we would like our loved ones to live forever.
I never intended to address it to anybody in particular. I sincerely apologize if my comment has offended you, even if it was and still is not my intent to.

If i were to speak brashly, my point in that comment is that i would still desire a perpetual existence despite the fact that some argued and presented forward some credible points that outlined the negativity of the afromentioned situation. Among them is the repeated passings of the adored ones.
 
Jan 2019
130
USA
#68
There has to be a limit to our brain capacity, and as I get older I do feel my brain is getting "full". But I can function well enough mentally, just so long as there is no real deterioration; I assume that one premise of this discussion that we live forever with our bodies and brains intact.

Another premise I assume is that the chance to live forever is made generally available (it isn't being suggested that only Bobbaloo gets it) so your friends should remain with you.
If I can keep friends and family around with me- Heck yeah, I want to live forever. Sure, some things in life suck. There is a lot of things in life that are a blast though.
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,095
Australia
#69
From too much love of living,
From hope and fear set free,
We thank with brief thanksgiving
Whatever gods may be
That no life lives for ever;
That dead men rise up never;
That even the weariest river
Winds somewhere safe to sea.

Then star nor sun shall waken,
Nor any change of light:
Nor sound of waters shaken,
Nor any sound or sight:
Nor wintry leaves nor vernal,
Nor days nor things diurnal;
Only the sleep eternal
In an eternal night.

- Swinburne
 

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