Do you think Ancient Egypt is overrated?

Oct 2013
5,478
Planet Nine, Oregon
I would be surprised if that site ever got fixed, but at least the maps still work.

But here is a reconstruction of the "throne" of Queen Hetepheres. And the same basic design in use a thousand years later with Tutankhamun, and a further thousand years and more on from him, and only overtaken in modern times on padding and comfort, but not style.

Spectacular.:zany: In every way. It's interesting how short the legs are on some thrones and chairs --they would have sat in a different posture than we do today. Pharaohs had the footstools too.
Hetepheres' chair repro:

Original:
. They are often credited with inventing chairs.
 
Last edited:
Oct 2013
5,478
Planet Nine, Oregon
I would be surprised if that site ever got fixed, but at least the maps still work.

But here is a reconstruction of the "throne" of Queen Hetepheres. And the same basic design in use a thousand years later with Tutankhamun, and a further thousand years and more on from him, and only overtaken in modern times on padding and comfort, but not style.

That's what makes their art so appealing to me; elegance and simplicity of design punctuated with rich ornamentation derived from natural forms; it appears modern and primordial at the same time, and nothing compares to it, for me.
 

Corvidius

Ad Honorem
Jul 2017
2,145
Crows nest
It sometimes, gold apart, seems a bit modern Scandinavian in the way it is stylish and utilitarian, for instance many items could be packed away for transport and then reassembled, a bit like Ikea. I also think they used a lot of pillows. Some of the unused coffins in KV63 were packed full of high quality plump pillows, and I think the arms of all their chairs are too high to be of any use without the seat being heavily padded out with pillows.
 
Mar 2017
803
Colorado
It sometimes, gold apart, seems a bit modern Scandinavian in the way it is stylish and utilitarian, for instance many items could be packed away for transport and then reassembled, a bit like Ikea. I also think they used a lot of pillows. Some of the unused coffins in KV63 were packed full of high quality plump pillows, and I think the arms of all their chairs are too high to be of any use without the seat being heavily padded out with pillows.
From that Met article:
-------------------------
"At first sight Tut-ankh-Amun's chair may
not seem designed for relaxation, but we have :
only to look at the scene on the golden back
of the famous throne from his tomb (Figure
33) to see that this is not necessarily so. Here is
the king, attended by his wife, lolls on a chair
exactly like the ones just discussed, shielded
from its uncomfortable bareness by a cushion
that appears to be about five inches thick.
Such upholstered chairs were still in fashion,
a hundred and fifty years later: they were
among the rich furnishings represented on the
walls of the tomb of Ramesses III, where
painted designs on the cushions suggest that
they were covered with tapestry. (Tut-ankhAmun's
cushion still retains traces of a diaper
pattern.) Few actual cushions have been preserved,
but one comes from the tomb of Tut- 17. It is squarish, of a double thickness of stuffed with pigeon feathers; in the center
is a little pink rectangle bordered with
strips of yellow, pink, and white. It was made
to fit the seat of the chair near which it was
found, one of three in the tomb that were of
the royal type with sloping arms. "
 
Oct 2013
5,478
Planet Nine, Oregon
It sometimes, gold apart, seems a bit modern Scandinavian in the way it is stylish and utilitarian, for instance many items could be packed away for transport and then reassembled, a bit like Ikea. I also think they used a lot of pillows. Some of the unused coffins in KV63 were packed full of high quality plump pillows, and I think the arms of all their chairs are too high to be of any use without the seat being heavily padded out with pillows.
Exactly. The "chariot canopy" even the meal containers. As you suggest without all of the pillows some things would be torture devices. They seem to have had lots of pillows at Amarna. I love Tut's beaded hassock:



"I love your big head".
" No, I love YOUR big head... "
Use your imagination.
 
Last edited:

Corvidius

Ad Honorem
Jul 2017
2,145
Crows nest
From that Met article:
-------------------------
"At first sight Tut-ankh-Amun's chair may
not seem designed for relaxation, but we have :
only to look at the scene on the golden back
of the famous throne from his tomb (Figure
33) to see that this is not necessarily so. Here is
the king, attended by his wife, lolls on a chair
exactly like the ones just discussed, shielded
from its uncomfortable bareness by a cushion
that appears to be about five inches thick.
Such upholstered chairs were still in fashion,
a hundred and fifty years later: they were
among the rich furnishings represented on the
walls of the tomb of Ramesses III, where
painted designs on the cushions suggest that
they were covered with tapestry. (Tut-ankhAmun's
cushion still retains traces of a diaper
pattern.) Few actual cushions have been preserved,
but one comes from the tomb of Tut- 17. It is squarish, of a double thickness of stuffed with pigeon feathers; in the center
is a little pink rectangle bordered with
strips of yellow, pink, and white. It was made
to fit the seat of the chair near which it was
found, one of three in the tomb that were of
the royal type with sloping arms. "
Which would I think provide a means for what must have been a diminutive Tut to fit into a chair too big for him, but still a bit naff for a state occasion, maybe.
 
Oct 2013
5,478
Planet Nine, Oregon
I think the thrones, (some upholstered) were also depicted in The Grammar of Ornament ; I have the book somewhere, and the first edition is in the public domain now; it's online, but not all of it. Again too bad about Theban Mapping Project; They had the thrones along with copies of now perished images of various vessels, standards, weapons and armour.