Does anyone have information on this item?

Aug 2014
3,811
Australia
#4
Scotland has very strict anti-looting laws. Best to turn it in immediately. Or better yet, leave it in situ and call someone. Moving the artefact often destroys much of its context and lowers its value significantly.
 
Last edited:
Aug 2014
3,811
Australia
#6
How do you know whether it qualifies as treasure unless you turn it in?

In any case, beaches are not exempt. Coastal erosion is constantly revealing important cultural artefacts, which are all covered by the Scottish Heritage legislation.
 
Last edited:
Dec 2018
7
Scotland
#7
How do you know whether it qualifies as treasure unless you turn it in?
There are definitions of what is treasure in this country and what you have to and don’t have to turn in when using such items as metal detectors, if you are interested it also tells you the areas you can and cannot use metal detectors or other devices without permission. As long as you have land owners permission (in Scotland) then you can do anywhere except historic or protected sites, beaches however are not owned by land owners, they stay in the possession of the queen though what ever agency she has given that area too. Beaches are free to use metal detectors, scavenge, etc. So all good.

However if I find it to be something of interest I will hand it in with a location find for the interested agency, but I have to find exactly what it is to do that, otherwise it’s just an old piece of metal.
 
Dec 2018
7
Scotland
#8
How do you know whether it qualifies as treasure unless you turn it in?

In any case, beaches are not exempt. Coastal erosion is constantly revealing important cultural artefacts, which are all covered by the Scottish Heritage legislation.
Thanks Dan, just looking to see if anyone can tell me what it is, if I told you I found it in my shed, would that make it better?
 

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