Does anyone know the number of Tunisian, Algerian, and Moroccan Jews that settled in France?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,750
SoCal
There's data here on the number of Jews that were born in Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco that subsequently immigrated to Israel:

Aliyah - Wikipedia

However, does anyone know where I can find comparable data in regards to Maghrebi Jewish immigration to France? For the record, the two categories are not exclusive; some Maghrebi Jews might have first moved to France and then subsequently moved to Israel.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,750
SoCal
Also, I figure that I might as well ask an additional question here: What were the factors that motivated the Maghrebi Jews who settled in France to do this as opposed to settling in Israel?
 

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
5,926
Unfortunately the answer seems to be "No". There are estimates only, provided by the French Jewish community itself.

The basics seems to be that there were approx. half a million Jews living in the Maghred – Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia – up to about the 1960's. The communities then effectively collapsed as they upped and emigrated. The major targets were France, Israel, South America and the USA. Who went where seems largely to have been a matter of how "Frenchified" they were, and the emigrants to France were the best educated, most affluent group, while the poor folk mostly headed to Israel.

Can't seem to dredge up comprehensive estimates, but for Algeria I did find and estimate that as many as 125 000 Algerian Jews headed to France as part of the 800 000+ people who left at the Algerian independence, while only 15 000 went to Israel. (Seems broadly consistent with the Israeli figures.) A larger proportion of the Tunisian seem to have gone to Israel, while the Moroccans seem to have almost all gone to Israel. Again that seems consistent with how long and deeply established the French had become as a colonial power. The Jews in French Algeria were relatively a favoured group given special treatment, not least in how in 1870 they were granted French citizenship, unlike the Algerian Muslim majority, after which Algerian Jewish "Frenchification" really took off. There was some resistance to this French move to pull the Jews of Algeria into its own orbit, since the motivations were largely paternalistic. What seems to have happened was that Algerian Jews were largely seen as backwards and in need of modernization, but by the French Jewish community. There seems to have been rather a lot of French Jewish government functionaries with an agenda to get make the Algerian Jews "proper" Frenchmen, active for a rather long time. No such thing for the Muslim majority.
 
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Isleifson

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Aug 2013
4,122
Lorraine tudesque
There's data here on the number of Jews that were born in Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco that subsequently immigrated to Israel:

Aliyah - Wikipedia

However, does anyone know where I can find comparable data in regards to Maghrebi Jewish immigration to France? For the record, the two categories are not exclusive; some Maghrebi Jews might have first moved to France and then subsequently moved to Israel.
You should at least know the most famous one.

Jacques Attali - Wikipedia
 
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tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
14,100
Unfortunately the answer seems to be "No". There are estimates only, provided by the French Jewish community itself.

The basics seems to be that there were approx. half a million Jews living in the Maghred – Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia – up to about the 1960's. The communities then effectively collapsed as they upped and emigrated. The major targets were France, Israel, South America and the USA. Who went where seems largely to have been a matter of how "Frenchified" they were, and the emigrants to France were the best educated, most affluent group, while the poor folk mostly headed to Israel.

Can't seem to dredge up comprehensive estimates, but for Algeria I did find and estimate that as many as 125 000 Algerian Jews headed to France as part of the 800 000+ people who left at the Algerian independence, while only 15 000 went to Israel. (Seems broadly consistent with the Israeli figures.) A larger proportion of the Tunisian seem to have gone to Israel, while the Moroccans seem to have almost all gone to Israel. Again that seems consistent with how long and deeply established the French had become as a colonial power. The Jews in French Algeria were relatively a favoured group given special treatment, not least in how in 1870 they were granted French citizenship, unlike the Algerian Muslim majority, after which Algerian Jewish "Frenchification" really took off. There was some resistance to this French move to pull the Jews of Algeria into its own orbit, since the motivations were largely paternalistic. What seems to have happened was that Algerian Jews were largely seen as backwards and in need of modernization, but by the French Jewish community. There seems to have been rather a lot of French Jewish government functionaries with an agenda to get make the Algerian Jews "proper" Frenchmen, active for a rather long time. No such thing for the Muslim majority.
You are right... Just to add that Algeria as a long time French colony had special status, and Algerians (or those born there) had access to French citizenship under certain conditions (for the jews this was as you noted) -some of that special status is retained to this day- while moroccans and tunisians did not... Which would probably explain why it was a more "natural" choice for those of algerian origin to head to France....
 
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