Does the Scots originate from Ireland?

Mar 2019
2
Norway
The most famous theory on the origin of the scots is that they originated from the kingdom of Dál Riada situated in the northwestern part of Ireland. Where Dál Riada settled the west of Scotland.

This theory is disputed in Tim Clarkson's book The Picts: A History. (Don't know if it's his idea or not) Where he argues that the Scots were local people who were isolated from the eastern Picts by mountains and therefore had developed stronger ties to the Celts to the west.
This developed the Scots to have a Goidelic language instead of the language of the Picts. His main evidence backing this theory is the lack of Irish chieftain ''accessories''(i don't know what to call it, like a brooch or similar) which is very unusual for a supposed Irish colony of western Scotland.

What are your thoughts?
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,624
Dispargum
I suspect it has more to do with words changing definitions over time rather than with population displacement or mass migration. I doubt the Scots killed all of the Picts. Rather, the Scots came to dominate the Picts and intermarried with them so that eventually all of the Picts became Scots. Whether the Scots were always in the north of Britain or came from Ireland I don't know. Archeology works better the other way - the existence of Irish artifacts found in Scotland might prove migration (it could also prove trade or plunder), but the absence of artifacts only proves the absence of artifacts.
 
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Jan 2013
1,072
Toronto, Canada
I suspect that we'll be able to answer this question eventually - once we become good enough at genetic research to identify the origins of the bodies in graves from Dal Riada. In the short term, we have to use linguistic anthropology. We know that Scots used a Gaelic language, but we can't be certain why.
 
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Jul 2017
247
Neverland
The most famous theory on the origin of the scots is that they originated from the kingdom of Dál Riada situated in the northwestern part of Ireland. Where Dál Riada settled the west of Scotland.

This theory is disputed in Tim Clarkson's book The Picts: A History. (Don't know if it's his idea or not) Where he argues that the Scots were local people who were isolated from the eastern Picts by mountains and therefore had developed stronger ties to the Celts to the west.
This developed the Scots to have a Goidelic language instead of the language of the Picts. His main evidence backing this theory is the lack of Irish chieftain ''accessories''(i don't know what to call it, like a brooch or similar) which is very unusual for a supposed Irish colony of western Scotland.

What are your thoughts?
Good guess, they did come from Eire.

 
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Oct 2011
15
The name of Scotland is derived from the Latin Scotia - the tribe name Scoti applied to all Gaels (Irish People).

The word Scoti (or Scotti) was first used by the Romans. It is found in Latin texts from the 4th century describing an Irish group which raided the Roman Province of Britain.

In other words. Scotland is named in Irish people's stead.

Gaelic (Irish) political and social order, and associated culture, originated/evolved in Ireland during prehistoric times - and spread to Scotland.
 
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