Dura-Europos domus ecclesiae? Archaeology, Iconography & MSS

May 2011
2,925
Rural Australia
Was Dura-Europos refounded c.507 CE?


The following WIKI page provides a source that suggests c.507 CE the city of Dura Europos was refounded.
Does anyone have any further information about this?


Bartholomew the Apostle - Wikipedia

The 6th-century writer in Constantinople, Theodorus Lector, averred that in about 507, the Byzantine emperor Anastasius I Dicorus gave the body of Bartholomew to the city of Dura-Europos, which he had recently refounded.[17]

[17] Noted in Smith and Cheetham.​
 

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
26,175
Italy, Lago Maggiore
Comparing the niches in the center of the western walls:

Jewish Synagogue:

View attachment 20499


Christian Baptistry
The Torah niche was and is a common niche. It's not so particular from an architectural perspective. To recognize it you have to see a shell and above it the drawing of a temple with a menorah and usually also the sacrifice by Isaac. This doesn't exclude a reuse, of course. On the other hand, a tub in a Torah niche would be curious.
 

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
26,175
Italy, Lago Maggiore
Was Dura-Europos refounded c.507 CE?


The following WIKI page provides a source that suggests c.507 CE the city of Dura Europos was refounded.
Does anyone have any further information about this?


Bartholomew the Apostle - Wikipedia

The 6th-century writer in Constantinople, Theodorus Lector, averred that in about 507, the Byzantine emperor Anastasius I Dicorus gave the body of Bartholomew to the city of Dura-Europos, which he had recently refounded.[17]
[17] Noted in Smith and Cheetham.​
This is interesting, the authors are from XIX century [they wrote a dictionary of Christian Antiquities]. It would be great to find that work to evaluate their sources ... is that a tradition to link the saint to a later community? If the city had refounded there should be archaeological evidences of this. We can check this point.
 
May 2011
2,925
Rural Australia
The Torah niche was and is a common niche. It's not so particular from an architectural perspective. To recognize it you have to see a shell and above it the drawing of a temple with a menorah and usually also the sacrifice by Isaac.
Yes that is the description of the niche in the synagogue. The niche in the Christian church has a basin below, and stars overhead, with the Good Shepherd at the back at the top, with Adam and Eve below. Is that a reasonable description of the church niche?

This doesn't exclude a reuse, of course. On the other hand, a tub in a Torah niche would be curious.
What if the "tub" in the church was a storage tub with a timber lid that has not survived?

RE: Synagogue

How many times does David feature in the synagogue. Just once? WC3? (See below)

David as Warrior at Dura-Europos

Thus was David, the slinger and mightiest warrior available in the long memory of the Jewish and Christian traditions, imagined and claimed years later as a symbol of hope against a formidable foe. As a flock looks to their shepherd and an army looks to its hero for protection from enemies, so did the Christians of Dura-Europos craft the memory of David as the anointed victor that they hoped also to be.

[my formatting]​


Here is the torah niche in the western wall.

I cannot find the article from which this image has been copied.
Are there any comprehensive summaries of the synagogue mural art?
Particularly the murals that are directly above the niche.
Any ideas or links appreciated.



1280px-Dura_Europos_synagogue_frescoes.svg.png
 
May 2011
2,925
Rural Australia
This is interesting, the authors are from XIX century [they wrote a dictionary of Christian Antiquities]. It would be great to find that work to evaluate their sources ... is that a tradition to link the saint to a later community? If the city had refounded there should be archaeological evidences of this. We can check this point.
Theodorus Lector appears to have written a Church History somewhere before 543 CE.

Theodorus later continued his chronicle, using other available sources to write his Church History (Ἐκκλησιαστικὴ Ἱστορία) from the death of Theodosius II down to 518. The date of composition is not known, though it was probably finished before 543, as it can be conjectured that Theodorus would not have spoken of the "holy memory" of Theodoret following the onset of the Three-Chapter Controversy.[3] The chronicle has not survived; excerpts exist in other chronicles, and it is also quoted in a tract by John of Damascus, and by the acts of the Second Council of Nicaea. It is believed that a badly damaged manuscript of this work survives in the Library of St. Mark's in Venice, however no scholarly research has yet been done into it.​

Somewhere in it - if the WIKI claim is accurate - this author mentions that .... "about 507, the Byzantine emperor Anastasius I Dicorus gave the body of Bartholomew to the city of Dura-Europos, which he had recently refounded"
 

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
26,175
Italy, Lago Maggiore
Theodorus Lector appears to have written a Church History somewhere before 543 CE.

Theodorus later continued his chronicle, using other available sources to write his Church History (Ἐκκλησιαστικὴ Ἱστορία) from the death of Theodosius II down to 518. The date of composition is not known, though it was probably finished before 543, as it can be conjectured that Theodorus would not have spoken of the "holy memory" of Theodoret following the onset of the Three-Chapter Controversy.[3] The chronicle has not survived; excerpts exist in other chronicles, and it is also quoted in a tract by John of Damascus, and by the acts of the Second Council of Nicaea. It is believed that a badly damaged manuscript of this work survives in the Library of St. Mark's in Venice, however no scholarly research has yet been done into it.​

Somewhere in it - if the WIKI claim is accurate - this author mentions that .... "about 507, the Byzantine emperor Anastasius I Dicorus gave the body of Bartholomew to the city of Dura-Europos, which he had recently refounded"
The refoundation of a city shouldn't be so difficult to be detected by archaeologists [at least I think so]. Considering the conditions of the wall reinforced with terrain during the siege [as for I remember], I tend to imagine that such a refoundation involved a different area of the city. But I'm optimistic about the possibility to find a way to check this.
 

Moros

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
3,094
Was Dura-Europos refounded c.507 CE?


The following WIKI page provides a source that suggests c.507 CE the city of Dura Europos was refounded.
Does anyone have any further information about this?


Bartholomew the Apostle - Wikipedia

The 6th-century writer in Constantinople, Theodorus Lector, averred that in about 507, the Byzantine emperor Anastasius I Dicorus gave the body of Bartholomew to the city of Dura-Europos, which he had recently refounded.[17]
[17] Noted in Smith and Cheetham.​
Wikipedia gives a clear reference:- William Smith and Samuel Cheetham, A Dictionary of Christian Antiquities (1875).

The logical and sensible thing to do is to find out if the reference quoted actually does say what is being claimed.

The referenced book is available on-line, and the relevant passage is easy to find.

It is thus a simple matter to find out that a mistake has been made in the Wikipedia article.

The city mentioned in the quoted book was not Dura-Europos, but Dara. They are not the same place.

This article talks about Dara - Recent Research on Dara/ Anastasiopolis
 

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