Dwarka- Solid proof of Lord Krishna's existence & AIT's death

Nov 2014
1,979
Bhuloka
@Jaitrasimha.. Are you saying that Kashmiris and Dards are fair because of Hunza admixture and have nothing to do with Aryans? That's not true!

Leh is just a few kilometers away from kashmir. How many kashmiri pandits have mongoloid admixture?None.Why should we have the admixture of Hunza who live beyond leh and baltistan? why cant the Hunza themselves have dardic admixture?
 
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Apr 2019
79
India
But abduction marriages were actually pretty common in the Mahabharata. And pretty acceptable too, based on the fact that nobody ever criticizes Bhishma, Arjuna or any of the others who did it. And Bhishma's abduction of the three sisters wasn't even consensual, it was basically out and out kidnapping and rape, and yet it was considered completely acceptable.
Arjuna was prompted by Krishna to abduct Subhadra. Bheeshma fought with other kings while abducting three sisters. His justification for the abduction was that he is most powerful and valorous kshatriys among them all so only he deserves to win the Swayamvara. Not only this it was matter of Kuru pride that would have been threatened by getting rejected in Swayamvara.
But still the women were not forced upon. Amba rejected the marriage but unfortunately her beloved rejected her on the ground of being won by another man !
And there was a good guy called Parashuram who not only rebuked Bheeshma for unsurping her right of self-choice but also fought with him for 20+ days !
Karma paid Bheeshma back and he was killed by Amba's new avatar Shikhandi.
If we read Mahabharata carefully then we can get some intresting insights about the time-period of the epic.
 
Apr 2019
79
India
I did not say anything about historicity of Krishna in Dwarka at all. My point is even though epics like Mahabharat are fiction they can still tell us a lot of things about bygone era. Like Rakshas marriage was socially acceptable in that era or Swayamvaras lost their true purpose at the time etc. I think Mahabharata is more like historic fiction in which many characters are imaginary and many bear name of real people. City of Dwarika was real so was Hastinapur and Kampilya.
 

rvsakhadeo

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
8,899
India
I did not say anything about historicity of Krishna in Dwarka at all. My point is even though epics like Mahabharat are fiction they can still tell us a lot of things about bygone era. Like Rakshas marriage was socially acceptable in that era or Swayamvaras lost their true purpose at the time etc. I think Mahabharata is more like historic fiction in which many characters are imaginary and many bear name of real people. City of Dwarika was real so was Hastinapur and Kampilya.
Mahabharata itself claims in its opening stanzas that it is History. As often has happened with ancient works, there are a lot of insertions/interpolations which can be seen to be later attempts to advocate some peculiar views or even fiction. The basic stuff of this epic is history and not fiction. And I have no hesitation in saying that Krishna was a historical person.
The objection to the historicity of Krishna looks to me as an atheist historian's view. Let us for a moment set aside the version of the attribution of Krishna being an incarnation of God, and then what is there to proclaim that Krishna is a creation of fiction? The very existence of the submerged city of Dwaraka, the very permeation of the idea of Krishna into the culture of India cries out that Krishna was a historic personality.
 
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Aatreya

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
3,441
USA
proving lord krishna with bhit dwarka archaeology is the same as AMT/AIT theories tbh. on one hand we have lord krishna, on other hand we have arctic aryans.

regards
Read the Chandogya Upanishad. In no uncertain terms is Krishna, the Devakiputra is mentioned as the disciple of Ghora Angirasa. There are two things that one can observe and infer:

1. Ghora Angirasa was a sage mentioned in Rig Veda and has a hymn attributed to him along with VishwAmitra
2. Krishna was a historical figure as much as Ghora was, and might have been a great personality of his times (a sage himself if you will).
 
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rvsakhadeo

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
8,899
India
Read the Chandogya Upanishad. In no uncertain terms is Krishna, the Devakiputra is mentioned as the disciple of Ghora Angirasa. There are two things that one can observe and infer:

1. Ghora Angirasa was a sage mentioned in Rig Veda and has a hymn attributed to him along with VishwAmitra
2. Krishna was a historical figure as much as Ghora was, and might have been a great personality of his times (a sage himself if you will).
I will be grateful if you can please give the chapter no.and stanza no.quoting Deva ki putra as the disciple of Ghora Angirasa.
 

Aatreya

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
3,441
USA
I will be grateful if you can please give the chapter no.and stanza no.quoting Deva ki putra as the disciple of Ghora Angirasa.
Sure Sir, here we go:

ChAndOgya Upanishat 3.17.6 (Purusha yajnya)

taddhaiadghOra Angirasah Krshnaya dEvakIputrAyOktvOvAchApipAsa Eva sa babhUva sOntavElAyAmEtatrayam
pratipadyEtAkshitamasyuchyutamasi prANasamshitamasIti tatraiva dvE rchau bhavatah

English:
GhOra Angirasa preached this yajnya darshana (philosophy of sacrifice) to Devakiputra KrshNa: The sacrificer should surrender to these three mantras - You (PrANAditya) are immortal (akshaya), you are immutable (Achyuta), you are prANa swarUpa. Hearing this, KrshNa became satiated with knowledge.

GhOra AngIrasa appears in RV 3.36.10 as the Rshi along with VishwAmitra who is the Rshi of the other Rchas in the SUkta.
 
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rvsakhadeo

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
8,899
India
Yes, thanks, I read that stanza from the English translation made by Swami Gambhirananda of the Adwaitashram, ISBN 81-7505-100-0. I have only an abridged version of the Rigveda in Marathi translation, could not find the pertinent stanza there.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,204
New Delhi, India
There is one more Dwarika in Gujarat, Kodinar, which is known as Mool Dwarika. Similarly there are two more archaeological sites near by. 'Dwarika' means 'the Gate'. Gujarat was trading with the Gulf region. There may have been many Dwarikas for different people. (I don't like it when people spell it as Dwarka)
Kodinar - Wikipedia
 

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