Earliest physical depiction of Buddha?

Feb 2013
724
#11
The curious thing is Kamandal (water pot) in his hand. did Buddhist monks or even Budhha ever carry Kamandal in their hand like the one shown in the image? Has it been mentioned in the literature or portrayed in painting or sculptures?






It's usually held by a attendant of sort in some religious processions. I've seen this on couple of occasions, what was it's purpose?
 
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Feb 2013
724
#12
Anyway,I wonder why Buddha is not depicted in his usual ascetic robes in Chandraketugarh.

It was proabably a Greek influenced fashion that stuck onto Buddhism. Indians just took it and ran with it.




himation for example







What's interesting is the artist in Gandhara, and I assume much before then, would make Buddha heavily robed.






But bodhisattva images would be mostly bare chested with a lot of jewelry, earring still on, hair fashioned, etc. Essentially an image of a King.
 
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Vajra

Ad Honorem
May 2013
4,332
India
#13
Interesting find Vajra... Thanks for sharing it with us..:)
You're welcome :)

The curious thing is Kamandal (water pot) in his hand. did Buddhist monks or even Budhha ever carry Kamandal in their hand like the one shown in the image? Has it been mentioned in the literature or portrayed in painting or sculptures?
Well,it is also depicted in early Stupas like Sanchi and Bharhut,as shown by Aberc :)

Usually,only Brahmins carry Kamandalu.Even today the Sadhus and Sanyasins always have Kamandalu beside them.

Another curious thing is the person washing the feet. Reminds me of Charanamrita kind of ritual. Has it been part of Buddhist rituals too? or did they ever observe it in past? any mention?
I think it is related to this [ame=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddha_footprint]Buddha footprint - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]
 

Vajra

Ad Honorem
May 2013
4,332
India
#15
It was proabably a Greek influenced fashion that stuck onto Buddhism. Indians just took it and ran with it.




himation for example







What's interesting is the artist in Gandhara, and I assume much before then, would make Buddha heavily robed.






But bodhisattva images would be mostly bare chested with a lot of jewelry, earring still on, hair fashioned, etc. Essentially an image of a King.
I think we have images of Brahmins and Ascetics wearing the same Greek style robs,from Bharhut and Sanchi reliefs.I think it was the so called uttariya dress.
Yes,Bodhisattvas are similarly depicted like the figure from Chandraketugarh,bare chested and with normal dhoti pant like clothings as other males.But the deers,lotus,tree etc made me assume that it was Buddha and not Bodhisattva.
 
Feb 2013
724
#17
I think we have images of Brahmins and Ascetics wearing the same Greek style robs,from Bharhut and Sanchi reliefs.I think it was the so called uttariya dress.
Yes,Bodhisattvas are similarly depicted like the figure from Chandraketugarh,bare chested and with normal dhoti pant like clothings as other males.But the deers,lotus,tree etc made me assume that it was Buddha and not Bodhisattva.
Nah, that just me going off. I just find it interesting they made two different representations for the Buddha and Bodhisattva over in the NW. One robed, one an image/model of a king.

I also think that Chandraketugarh one could be a Buddha image too. But a more original, native representation of him. I dont know what the professionals say about it though.

The OP labels it as Bodhisattva, I dont know how they came to that conclusion.

http://www.asianart.com/arga/d15894.html
 
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Vajra

Ad Honorem
May 2013
4,332
India
#18
Nah, that just me going off. I just find it interesting they made two different representations for the Buddha and Bodhisattva over in the NW. One robed, one an image/model of a king.
Possibly it represents the dual aspects i.e Chakravartin/king and Arhat/monk,which are the only suitable careers for a man with all 32 noble marks of a great man.

The OP labels it as Bodhisattva, I dont know how they came to that conclusion.

Votive Plaque with Bodhisattva on Arga Inc.
Me neither!
 

SSDD

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
3,900
India
#19
Beautifully summed up,thank you! I never knew Buddha almost gave up on his quest for the enlightenment! Could you explain what was so important about that maiden who carried milk?How did Buddha attained enlightenment after seeing her?
The maiden was Sujata, it was milk-rice. Buddha then was wondering with 6 ascetics who practiced extreme level of self-discipline, fast. Buddha when wondering with them, during a bath became so weak because of fast that he almost drowned, but he anyhow saved himself by catching plant's branch. After getting up to bank, a bit away he again became weak and fell, now seeing himself so weak, the girl gave him milk-rice, after eating that Buddha regained his strength and reconsidered the path of such extreme sacrifice and began meditation.

Now his companions who saw Buddha accepting milk-rice thought Buddha had left the path and abandoned him.
 

Vajra

Ad Honorem
May 2013
4,332
India
#20
The maiden was Sujata, it was milk-rice. Buddha then was wondering with 6 ascetics who practiced extreme level of self-discipline, fast. Buddha when wondering with them, during a bath became so weak because of fast that he almost drowned, but he anyhow saved himself by catching plant's branch. After getting up to bank, a bit away he again became weak and fell, now seeing himself so weak, the girl gave him milk-rice, after eating that Buddha regained his strength and reconsidered the path of such extreme sacrifice and began meditation.

Now his companions who saw Buddha accepting milk-rice thought Buddha had left the path and abandoned him.
I see,so this is what made Buddha to go through the middle way :)
 

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