Egyptian Story Like Sargon/Moses?

Oct 2014
149
California, USA
#1
So, I read somewhere that there was an Egyptian story which was similar to the stories of Sargon and Mosus where a baby was hidden in the reeds and found. It was one of the egyptian gods who was hidden like that. But I can't find the story now. Anyone know about it?
 
Mar 2017
801
Colorado
#2
I don't know about Sargon, but there's three other Moses stories besides the Jewish one.

4 Completely Different Versions of the Story of Moses

I like the Strabo story, possibly because I stumbled on it while looking for something else. It's very no nonsense. Highly placed Egyptian priest decides monotheism is the way to go, takes some followers, Pharoah says "have a nice life", Moses founds Jerusalem, and is a very clever ruler. No 10 plagues, no chasing Pharaoh, no Red Sea, no dying before the Promised Land, no 40 yrs. It's very believable. I'm guessing this is the common narrative for non-Jews in the 1st century BCE.
 

Corvidius

Ad Honorem
Jul 2017
2,141
Crows nest
#3
The story of Horus before he became old enough to challenge Set would sort of fit for a baby "hidden in reeds", as he was born in the marshes when Isis was hiding from Set.
 

Bart Dale

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
6,866
#4
The story of Horus before he became old enough to challenge Set would sort of fit for a baby "hidden in reeds", as he was born in the marshes when Isis was hiding from Set.
But Horus wasn't abandoned and raised by stranger, just being born in a marsh isn't really the same thing.

I think all these babies found in a marshnor whatever had a common theme and purpose. You are are commoner that came to power. By your speech, it was obvious you were raised as a commoner, impossible to hide that fact. But the being found in March allows you to claim to.be really of noble birth, just that you were raised by common.folk. By the time you came to power, most of the people.at the time of your birth would likely be dead, so no one would be around to.dispute it, and it was always done in secret anyways. Everyone is happy, the nobles get to maintain the myth that only nobles can really rule, an idea useful for the ruler to discourage others from doing what he did.

What is interesting about the Moses story it is the reverse -- it is about a noble who was actually.a commoner. Moses was raised in the Egyptian court, there would be no disguisng the fact in his speech, but his story allows him to maintain he was really a Hebrew all.along. Aaron acted as his spokesman because Moses probably couldn't speak Hebrew well or with a heavy accent. If you were a priest of the now disgraced Aten sect, you might want to gather new believers among the Semitic workers in Egypt, and it would be better to leave Egypt at a head of a large group than all by yourself. True, you would have to change the name of your God and.some other changes to make him.accptable to your new believers, but what is in a name? And a small price to.pay for a whole new set of believers .
 
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Corvidius

Ad Honorem
Jul 2017
2,141
Crows nest
#5
But Horus wasn't abandoned and raised by stranger, just being born in a marsh isn't really the same thing.
Only the story of Horus fits, in general terms, for the question that was asked as regards an Egyptian god. Given that the story of Horus predates the Moses myth by several millenia, it is not beyond the bounds of possibility that the story of Isis hiding with Horus in the marshes was adapted, at least as far as marshes and hiding is concerned, along with a great deal more of Egypt, by the Hebrews in the process of inventing their own mythology.

The Akhenaten = Moses thing is well known of course, but this adaptation and severe contortion of Egyptian myth and history goes much further, for instance the idea that Thutmosis III was the blueprint for King David, and Amunhotep III being the blueprint for Solomon. Whether this was so or not I don't know, nobody does, but it is interesting that Egyptian myths aside, the 18th Dynasty, the post Hyksos era, does seem to be from where the Hebrew nation creating myths originate.
 
Aug 2014
103
New York, USA
#6
I don't know about Sargon, but there's three other Moses stories besides the Jewish one.

4 Completely Different Versions of the Story of Moses

I like the Strabo story, possibly because I stumbled on it while looking for something else. It's very no nonsense. Highly placed Egyptian priest decides monotheism is the way to go, takes some followers, Pharoah says "have a nice life", Moses founds Jerusalem, and is a very clever ruler. No 10 plagues, no chasing Pharaoh, no Red Sea, no dying before the Promised Land, no 40 yrs. It's very believable. I'm guessing this is the common narrative for non-Jews in the 1st century BCE.
Be careful not to confuse "independent, but similar" stories, such as Sargon of Akkad's birth legend and "later re-interpretation of the Jewish story" Strabo. Strabo writes over 1000 years after the alleged events took place, and he, having read the Jewish Torah, simply re-interprets the Jewish texts that he is reading in a secular way.
 

Bart Dale

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
6,866
#7
I don't know about Sargon, but there's three other Moses stories besides the Jewish one.

4 Completely Different Versions of the Story of Moses

I like the Strabo story, possibly because I stumbled on it while looking for something else. It's very no nonsense. Highly placed Egyptian priest decides monotheism is the way to go, takes some followers, Pharoah says "have a nice life", Moses founds Jerusalem, and is a very clever ruler. No 10 plagues, no chasing Pharaoh, no Red Sea, no dying before the Promised Land, no 40 yrs. It's very believable. I'm guessing this is the common narrative for non-Jews in the 1st century BCE.
The other stories about Moses are no more historically accurate, probably even less so, and are newer. Both the Egyptian and Strabo sources can be rather biased against the Jews, and the mere fact that he says Moses founds Jerusalem shows really how unreliable the Strabo story can be, since even the Old Testament never said Moses founded Jerusalem, and acknowledged that Jerusalem was a city that had existed before the Jews arrived/arose. No archaeologist thinks the Jews created Jerusalem. The historical accuracy of the Old Testament is extremely dubious with regards to Moses, but the other sources might not be much better.

While Strabo story might seen more no nonsense, some of what he says we know just isn't so, like Moses founding Jerusalem, or being a ruler of it. And it suffers from the same lack of supporting evidence, there is no Egyptian record of an Egyptian priest leading followers out Egypt with the Pharaoh's blessing, and the face of it, really is not much more plausible than the Old Testament. Ancient rulers just didn't allow their subjects to leave their rule, and say "OK, set up a a rival kingdom with my blessings, that might threaten the cities under my control" Ancient rulers just didn't do that kind of thing, and really, is as unlikely as the scenario found in the Old Testament.