English language... 'Anglo-Frisian' or 'West Germanic'?

Is English rather an 'Anglo-Frisian' or a 'West Germanic' language?

  • Anglo-Frisian

    Votes: 13 52.0%
  • West Germanic

    Votes: 7 28.0%
  • other

    Votes: 5 20.0%

  • Total voters
    25
Jul 2011
579
western Europe
#31
Not as many as Iberian languages.

I.don't believe languages should be classified via their vocabulary.
As one could also suggest that languages could even be classified according to other factors, such as sound pattern ...

e.g. : English, Irish, Persian and Portuguese could potentially be all grouped together (fronted vowels, diphtongisation etc.).
 
Jun 2015
5,499
UK
#33
As one could also suggest that languages could even be classified according to other factors, such as sound pattern ...

e.g. : English, Irish, Persian and Portuguese could potentially be all grouped together (fronted vowels, diphtongisation etc.).
One can suggest anything. It's just this line of argument is weird since the linguistic standard is to classify languages via "genetic" and grammatical evolution. It's an interesting point, but per current linguistic standards English is clearly Germanic.

I'm not a linguist though, so I don't know the full ins and outs, and if there is a movement to change the language classification system.
 
Oct 2015
4,609
Matosinhos Portugal
#36
I did not speak in lexicon, I just say the Germanic alphabet is similar to English Portuguese Italian Dutch French Spanish etc. etc. Alphabet is Latin is not Germanic. (English language 60% Latin 30% germanica. Correct or not, tell me)


I have no problem saying that the Portuguese language, which has words of Greek origin - Arabic - Hebrew - Latin as it has African words as has Asian word etc. etc. with these mixtures made enrich the Portuguese language, that many English words are of Portuguese origin and other European countries of Latin language

Jangada source Asia posted in Portuguese ( Jangada - Raft ) Bunda word origin African Bunda Ass )


Às

in Portuguese it is said to be the same as English, but the synonym is not the same.

Ass - in portuguese Cu

Cu - In Romanian has another meaning.

notgivenaway . I'm not a teacher I did not care to be

Banana - bananinha - bananinho - bananeiro - Cuba - Cubita - Cubinha - Cubata
 
Oct 2015
4,609
Matosinhos Portugal
#38
of course not.

I do not even think English is Latin.


Crime is latin Similar is latin etc.etc. 60% of the English language is Latin, correct.

the languages, Portuguese and France Spanish Italian, are all Latin to 100%
Of course not,correct.
 

authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
4,900
#39
Languages are classified by their group and defined by their filial relationships within that group. The most common model is the divergent branching tree model. English is a low west germanic language as are platt and the three frisian languages. English is not the same as german but german and english are cognates. Both descend from a common ancestor. You could import the entire Malay dictionary into english tomorrow and it would not change the grouping. Nor is this a far fetched. Over 2,000,000 latinised and greek terms entered english with the sciences, especially when botanists and naturalists started wandering around places like South America. There are 12,000 different species of ant and over 40,000 types of rice. They all have names. Doesn't change the filial relationships or the past. It only influences how it evolves and in the case of this example, not much if at all.

Writing systems are completely different to language. Language has existed where there was no writing system for most of human history.
 

Ficino

Ad Honorem
Apr 2012
6,664
Romania
#40
of course not.

I do not even think English is Latin.


Crime is latin Similar is latin etc.etc. 60% of the English language is Latin, correct.

the languages, Portuguese and France Spanish Italian, are all Latin to 100%
Of course not,correct.
What means for a language like Portuguese etc. to be "100% Latin"?! Unlike English they are Romance languages, but they can't be "100% Latin" because they aren't the Latin itself.
 

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