English language... 'Anglo-Frisian' or 'West Germanic'?

Is English rather an 'Anglo-Frisian' or a 'West Germanic' language?

  • Anglo-Frisian

    Votes: 13 48.1%
  • West Germanic

    Votes: 8 29.6%
  • other

    Votes: 6 22.2%

  • Total voters
    27

Bart Dale

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
7,095
#51
Most latinate words in english enter the language via french after 1300. There are often two words to mean the same thing, one english and one french, eg slaughterer and butcher, shoemaker and cobbler, foreword and preface etc.
The French words werepeobablyn introduced as a result of the Norman conquest, and probably entered the English earlier, 1300 is just when English begsn to be use more in writing again, and so these words became noticable.

A lot of Latin words were introduced by scholarship starting in the modern era, say the 17th century and beyond. Lot of science words were derived from Latin.
 

authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
5,219
#52
The French words werepeobablyn introduced as a result of the Norman conquest, and probably entered the English earlier, 1300 is just when English begsn to be use more in writing again, and so these words became noticable.

A lot of Latin words were introduced by scholarship starting in the modern era, say the 17th century and beyond. Lot of science words were derived from Latin.

Norman french initiated it but it remained a language of the royal households, of the church, adminstration and justice. It didn't filter down into everday english. When the king of England lost Normandy classical french replaced norman french which had a lower status. This is when words like beef and pork enter the everday language (13th cent) and many everday words are borrowed by english until the 16th/17th century. There are a very large number of scientific and technical words which are created using latin and greek starting to enter the language at this time, like microscope (1650s). They are however not words any classical greek or roman would have understood. You mentioned morgue, that enters english in 1821. Prior to that, and still in use, was the word mortuary, from the 14th century from french mortuarie "gift to a parish priest from a deceased parishioner," from Medieval Latin mortuarium. La Morgue was a specific building in Paris, from French morguer "look solemnly," from Vulgar Latin *murricare ".

Although the norman invasion started the influx, norman french has more or less died out, although Jèrriais is still an official language in Jersey.
 
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