Europe facing the danger of Internet censorship

Oct 2013
13,217
Europix
Maybe I am paranoid, but I don't like whole idea on principle. Government will start to decide what can be posted on internet, this can't be good. Anyway I often have trouble caring for political issues, this is something that I can follow and base my vote on.
"Audiatur et altera pars" is never a bad idea in forming an idea, or an opinion.

So here's another interpretation of the possible repercussions of the 13th article:

Article 13 Copyright Directive
 

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
24,971
Lago Maggiore, Italy
About the "Flat Earth" ...

from a scientific perspective you need to change physical laws to sustain that theory.

Gravity is a symmetric force, so that if I weight the same all around the surface of the planet [I mean with a tolerance of grams, since the Earth is a spheroid, not a perfect sphere], this planet has to be spherical, it cannot be flat. If it was flat I will weight very different from the edge to the center of the planet. This doesn't happen = Earth is spherical.
 
Nov 2018
124
Denmark
This is something which was already clear in the first version of the directive. Historum could be considered significant in Romania [this is really curious, but we are among the 1,000 most active websites in Romania ...], but in the whole EU Historum is under the limits stated by the direction for its application.
Credit to the Romanians. :)
I thought the purpose of the EU was to harmonize things in the member countries.
 

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
24,971
Lago Maggiore, Italy
Credit to the Romanians. :)
I thought the purpose of the EU was to harmonize things in the member countries.
Never thought that: the German-French leadership wants to harmonize member countries to German-French standards. UK doesn't like this, this is why they are leaving, perhaps, may be, Mrs May permitting ...
 
Likes: Tammuz
Nov 2016
479
Germany
In protest against the planned law, the German Wikipedia closed for today. Here is my translation of the explanation displayed by Wikipedia:

Dear Visitor,

why can't you use Wikipedia as usual? The authors of Wikipedia have decided to shut Wikipedia down today in protest against parts of the planned EU copyright reform. This law is due to be passed by the European Union Parliament on 26 March.

The planned reform could lead to a considerable restriction of the free Internet. Even the smallest Internet platforms would have to prevent copyright infringements by their users (Article 13 of the planned law), which would in practice only be possible by means of error- and misuse-prone upload filters. In addition, all websites would have to acquire licences for short text excerpts from press products in order to comply with a newly introduced publishers' right (Article 11). Both together could significantly impair freedom of expression, freedom of the arts and freedom of the press.

Although at least Wikipedia is explicitly excluded from Article 13 of the new Copyright Directive (but not from Article 11), Free Knowledge will suffer even if Wikipedia remains an oasis in the filtered desert of the Internet.

Some five million people in a petition, 145 civil rights and human rights organisations, business and IT associations (including Bitkom, the German Start-up Association and the Chaos Computer Club), Internet pioneers such as Tim Berners-Lee, journalists' associations and creative professionals are also protesting against the current version of the reform.
 
Oct 2013
13,217
Europix
In protest against the planned law, the German Wikipedia closed for today. Here is my translation of the explanation displayed by Wikipedia:

Dear Visitor,

why can't you use Wikipedia as usual? The authors of Wikipedia have decided to shut Wikipedia down today in protest against parts of the planned EU copyright reform. This law is due to be passed by the European Union Parliament on 26 March.

The planned reform could lead to a considerable restriction of the free Internet. Even the smallest Internet platforms would have to prevent copyright infringements by their users (Article 13 of the planned law), which would in practice only be possible by means of error- and misuse-prone upload filters. In addition, all websites would have to acquire licences for short text excerpts from press products in order to comply with a newly introduced publishers' right (Article 11). Both together could significantly impair freedom of expression, freedom of the arts and freedom of the press.

Although at least Wikipedia is explicitly excluded from Article 13 of the new Copyright Directive (but not from Article 11), Free Knowledge will suffer even if Wikipedia remains an oasis in the filtered desert of the Internet.

Some five million people in a petition, 145 civil rights and human rights organisations, business and IT associations (including Bitkom, the German Start-up Association and the Chaos Computer Club), Internet pioneers such as Tim Berners-Lee, journalists' associations and creative professionals are also protesting against the current version of the reform.
Besides the answer to the (identical) post on another thread, I'll give You another example of disingenuousity:

"Both together could significantly impair freedom of expression, freedom of the arts and freedom of the press. "

The best warranty for the freedom remains financial independence. Being able to.live from Your work.

One of the reasons journalism is in such a crisis is also because there is less and less money to pay jurnalists, to pay for through investigation journalism, for war reporters aso. And the first suffering aren't the big press corporations, but the small ones, the free-lancers.

So, in the name of fredom of expression, we are against paying those jurnalists, we want to continue to use their work free of charge.

And we expect that by unpaying jurnalists, artists, to see more freedom of expression, more creativity ?