Europe was the birthplace of mankind, not Africa, scientists find

Mar 2019
1,535
KL
#4
i find this entire scenario of first humans/first men bogus, it is possible that there were multiple modern humans in different parts of the world arising independently. Archaoelogists have found multitude of cultures similar to africans even in india and pakistan, the soanian culture for instance the one in south india is another example which has been recently discovered. archaeologists like mark kenoyer has argued against this.

the first men theory from africa gave birth to the Darwinian racial theories and european superior human species theories in the first place.

Soanian - Wikipedia


regards
 
#5
i find this entire scenario of first humans/first men bogus, it is possible that there were multiple modern humans in different parts of the world arising independently. Archaoelogists have found multitude of cultures similar to africans even in india and pakistan, the soanian culture for instance the one in south india is another example which has been recently discovered. archaeologists like mark kenoyer has argued against this.

the first men theory from africa gave birth to the Darwinian racial theories and european superior human species theories in the first place.

Soanian - Wikipedia


regards
It's not clear what you mean. The article is about the ancestors of the genus Homo, looking at ancestral genera like Australopithecus and Graecopithecus. This is a matter of biological evolution, not the advent of different cultures.
 

authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
5,219
#6
No, much further back than that, back to the time when a hominid line called Panini split from the human (Homo) line, somewhere between 5 to 10 million years ago. Panini are those which evolved under Pan in the diagram below:




The study is about various fossils found and their relationship to the Pan and Homo, fossils known by names such as graecopithecus. They attempt to place the fossils in that tree and apply dates. It's an awful long time before modern humans though and even neanderthals. It is nothing to do with the spread of modern humans out of africa which was between 100,000 and 30,000 years ago.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,566
Portugal
#7
Aug 2010
16,202
Welsh Marches
#8
The headline is misleading. Everything is in flux at the moment with regard to human origins, and there is no certainty about anything; it will probably be a long time before any reliable conclusions can be drawn. The one sure thing is that one should ignore anything that is reported in newspapers about 'what scientists say' (a phrase that should always ring alarm bells from the very start).
 

authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
5,219
#10
The headline is misleading. Everything is in flux at the moment with regard to human origins, and there is no certainty about anything; it will probably be a long time before any reliable conclusions can be drawn. The one sure thing is that one should ignore anything that is reported in newspapers about 'what scientists say' (a phrase that should always ring alarm bells from the very start).
Yes, note the change in title from Potential hominin affinities of Graecopithecus from the Late Miocene of Europe to Europe was the birthplace of mankind, not Africa, scientists find and also note how 'Potential' is reported as 'was'.