European take a lot more vacation days than Americans

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Closed
Nov 2014
391
ph
#1
I guess my point in the 4 hour work week thread is to ppint out that Western Europeans take a lot more vacation days and work shorter hours than Americans, possibly due to at will employment laws, it will be fine is this is want people want, but statistics basically indicate very high burnout rates for millenial US workers, although is might be down to innate personality difference, which are basically fixed. Basically most millenial workers in the US think that the working environment there leaves a lot to be desired, and studies show anyway that the marginal efficiency of workers maxes out at the 8 or 9 hour mark anyway. American workers may be somewhat more productive than their French, Belgian, or Dutch counterparts, but are run a lot more ragged and on the edge to get those results, which seems to result in higher breakdown rates, I guess you can compare it to getting better results by constantly running your car at 6000 to 7000 rpm, versus getting by cruising at 2000 rpm.
 
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Nov 2014
391
ph
#4
What is the possibility of GM, Ford, or, Boeing allowing UAW or machinists union board seats like they do in the giant German industrial concerns, or allowing company wide collective bargaining?
 

deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
14,265
Europix
#6
... American workers may be somewhat more productive than their French, Belgian, or Dutch counterparts ...
That's a matter to discuss: what is taken into account to define "productivity"?

Is it about how much is produced in a working day, or in an hour? Is the quality of the product taken into account? Is the gain of the enterprise per working hour/day? Aso.

_______
OECD uses as measuring tool the GDP per hour worked, for example.

OECD's figures place US on the fifth place. But 'odder" is that is surpassed not by the "usual suspects" (Germany, Dutch and the likes)!

1. Luxembourg 93.4 ($/h)
2 Ireland 87.3
3. Norway 81.3
4. Belgium 69.7
5. USA 68.3
6. Denmark 67.6
7. France 65.6
8. Germany 65.5
9. Netherlands 65.4
10. Switzerland 64.2
 
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Likes: Tulius

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,992
US
#7
I guess my point in the 4 hour work week thread is to ppint out that Western Europeans take a lot more vacation days and work shorter hours than Americans, possibly due to at will employment laws, it will be fine is this is want people want, but statistics basically indicate very high burnout rates for millenial US workers, although is might be down to innate personality difference, which are basically fixed. Basically most millennial workers in the US think that the working environment there leaves a lot to be desired, and studies show anyway that the marginal efficiency of workers maxes out at the 8 or 9 hour mark anyway. American workers may be somewhat more productive than their French, Belgian, or Dutch counterparts, but are run a lot more ragged and on the edge to get those results, which seems to result in higher breakdown rates, I guess you can compare it to getting better results by constantly running your car at 6000 to 7000 rpm, versus getting by cruising at 2000 rpm.
Well, considering my father worked 40+ hours in a steel mill and my great grandfather probably worked over 70 hours a week in a steel mill, then at the railroad as he got older, I would say that, if millenials feel 40 hours is too much it has to be a physical issue (i.e., they are soft) or a psychological issue (they prefer leisure and play over work). I am not advocating the work dys of old, 6-7 days, 16 hours a day, but an 8 hour work day is not too much. I have done it for about 30 years. If one expects to work less hours, them generally speaking, they should expect less compensation and less spending power. What I am not in favor of, is somebody advocating to work little but have a similar material lifestyle as their parents by having somebody subsidize their lifestyle. It's your choice and your natural consequences.
 
Likes: macon

deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
14,265
Europix
#8
Well, considering my father worked 40+ hours in a steel mill and my great grandfather probably worked over 70 hours a week in a steel mill, then at the railroad as he got older, I would say that, if millenials feel 40 hours is too much it has to be a physical issue (i.e., they are soft) or a psychological issue (they prefer leisure and play over work). I am not advocating the work dys of old, 6-7 days, 16 hours a day, but an 8 hour work day is not too much. I have done it for about 30 years. If one expects to work less hours, them generally speaking, they should expect less compensation and less spending power. What I am not in favor of, is somebody advocating to work little but have a similar material lifestyle as their parents by having somebody subsidize their lifestyle. It's your choice and your natural consequences.
Theoretically, You are wrong in Your comparison on three generations because of the technological advancess and the gains in productivity.

(Sorry, I often think in blunt examples):

-A person needs 1 kg /day of potatoes to feed himself convenently.
- 50 years ago, grandpa had to work 3 hours to produce the 1kgof potatoes he needed
- today, I have to work 2 hours for producing that same kilo I need.

Theoretically, I have to work today 30% less to have the same thing my grandpa had.
 
Likes: Rodger
Mar 2019
1,188
Kansas
#9
Theoretically, You are wrong in Your comparison on three generations because of the technological advancess and the gains in productivity.

(Sorry, I often think in blunt examples): A person needs 1 kg /day of potatoes to feed himself convenently. My grandpa worked 3 hours to produce 1kg 50 years ago, I work 2 hours for producing that kilo today. Theoretically, I have to work today 30% less to have what my grandpa had.
Which is fine, but now factor all the stuff we like that does not directly relate to keeping us alive. Everything is cheaper generation to generation (say last 100 years) What is changing is the amount of stuff we want.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,992
US
#10
Theoretically, You are wrong in Your comparison on three generations because of the technological advancess and the gains in productivity.

(Sorry, I often think in blunt examples):

-A person needs 1 kg /day of potatoes to feed himself convenently.
- 50 years ago, grandpa had to work 3 hours to produce the 1kgof potatoes he needed
- today, I have to work 2 hours for producing that same kilo I need.

Theoretically, I have to work today 30% less to have the same thing my grandpa had.
I always respect your perspective deaf, and don't disagree with your post. But that doesn't' change the essence of the OP which is about one's desire to work, versus one's need. Again, I am not advocating for back breaking work. I went to the university so I would not have to. But an 8 hour work day is sufferable, especially of one wishes to provide for themselves and their family without asking for others to subsidize their lifestyle.
 
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Closed