European take a lot more vacation days than Americans

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deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
14,280
Europix
#31
Ok. I may be offering the stereotypical examples. I thought a good deal of people work in the government sector, at least more than in the U.S. If the taxes are fairly distributed, then so be it. What is the income tax rate for workers?
Semantic nitpicking (You know me ... ): what do You mean by working in the government sector?

Generally, statistics talk about "public sector" and "private sector".

A private entreprise (= "private sector") can very well work exclusively for the government, thus making benefits exclusively from our taxes, for example.

Public school, tho paid from our taxes, doesn't work for the government, for example.

Therefore my initial question.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,996
US
#32
In Denmark, the employment rate in 2017 was according to Denmark's statistics; 81.5% for men aged 15-64 and 76.1% for women aged 15-64.

According to the EU, the employment rate in 2018 was 17.5% for men aged 65-74 and 7.3% for women aged 65-74.

Those who are not in employment include people who are taking an education, people in prison, sick, retired and people outside the labor market.

So what motivates people in the generous Danish welfare society to get up every morning and go to work.

First of all, our creditors 57% of the population live in their own house. If you want to live in the cities outside Copenhagen, a house for 267,895 euros is minimum, if you want a decent house. In the capital, it is about twice as expensive. it's cheaper in the countryside, it is getting cheaper the farther away from the cities you want to live.

Although you rent, it is also not cheap especially if you want to live in a proper neighborhood without too many social losers.

That brings us to the next point, if there is something the hard-troubled taxpayers in Denmark despise, then it is people who do not work.

After all, most people do not like their fellows to look at them as if they had some kind of leprosy, so they will try to find a job as soon as possible.

And last but not least, many actually like their jobs, see it as part of their identity and take pride in doing it well.
Thanks for the information. When you reference the following, "the employment rate in 2017 was according to Denmark's statistics; 81.5% for men aged 15-64 and 76.1% for women aged 15-64," I assume you are referring to the labor participation rate. That is impressive. In the U.S. is it about 63%, and that is the highest it has been in the last few years. At one point it was near 60%. That is a good deal of work eligible people not working. You mention the cost of housing as a reason to work in Denmark. Do you have subsidized housing? The U.S. home owner rate is about 64%.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,996
US
#33
Semantic nitpicking (You know me ... ): what do You mean by working in the government sector?

Generally, statistics talk about "public sector" and "private sector".

A private entreprise (= "private sector") can very well work exclusively for the government, thus making benefits exclusively from our taxes, for example.

Public school, tho paid from our taxes, doesn't work for the government, for example.

Therefore my initial question.
Yes. I would equate the public sector with a "government job," one funded by taxpayers as opposed to those who are primarily not, i.e., "private."
 
Nov 2018
263
Denmark
#34
Thanks for the information. When you reference the following, "the employment rate in 2017 was according to Denmark's statistics; 81.5% for men aged 15-64 and 76.1% for women aged 15-64," I assume you are referring to the labor participation rate. That is impressive. In the U.S. is it about 63%, and that is the highest it has been in the last few years. At one point it was near 60%. That is a good deal of work eligible people not working. You mention the cost of housing as a reason to work in Denmark. Do you have subsidized housing? The U.S. home owner rate is about 64%.
Yes it is the labor participation rate. :)

One can get subsidized housing for apartments ,but there are a number of rules that determine how much and whether you can get housing benefit. I just looked at the rules and it looks complicated.:zany:

However, you don't have to have a particularly large income before you can't get anything, whether you work or not.
 
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deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
14,280
Europix
#35
.... What is the income tax rate for workers?
It can't be answered like that (there are some 40 countries in Europe, each with it's taxation system).

In Belgium You cannot talk about "tax rate for workers" as it's a taxation on income.

As an idea: tax on the annual meeting taxable income is progressive. Up to 11.000 Euro/year is 25%. The part from 11.000 to 13.000 is 30%, the part from 13.000 to 21.000 is 40%, the part from 21.000 to 38.000 is 45%, the part over 38.000 is 50%.

The net taxable income (used to calculate Your taxes) isn't necessarily Your net income: You can have "charges" that are deducted (kids, wife not working, parents You take care of, investments in Your own house, Your service car, aso).

I'd say an average worker, with a typical family, is in 20% - 40% section.

On the other hand, low incomes with children can be un-taxed and be actually reimbursed by the state.

Worse position in Belgium (most taxed) is single male, without children .....
 
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deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
14,280
Europix
#36
Yes. I would equate the public sector with a "government job," one funded by taxpayers as opposed to those who are primarily not, i.e., "private."
The most extended public sector (as percentage) it's the Scandinavian countries.

What I wouldn't had thought (oh, those stereotypes!) is that UK and US have a higher percentage than Spain, Italy, Germany.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,996
US
#37
It can't be answered like that (there are some 40 countries in Europe, each with it's taxation system).

In Belgium You cannot talk about "tax rate for workers" as it's a taxation on income.

As an idea: tax on the annual meeting taxable income is progressive. Up to 11.000 Euro/year is 25%. The part from 11.000 to 13.000 is 30%, the part from 13.000 to 21.000 is 40%, the part from 21.000 to 38.000 is 45%, the part over 38.000 is 50%.

The net taxable income (used to calculate Your taxes) isn't necessarily Your net income: You can have "charges" that are deducted (kids, wife not working, parents You take care of, investments in Your own house, Your service car, aso).

I'd say an average worker, with a typical family, is in 20% - 40% section.

On the other hand, low incomes with children can be un-taxed and be actually reimbursed by the state.

Worse position in Belgium (most taxed) is single male, without children .....
According to an article I just found, the average tax rate for a middle income American is about 14%.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,996
US
#39
The most extended public sector (as percentage) it's the Scandinavian countries.

What I wouldn't had thought (oh, those stereotypes!) is that UK and US have a higher percentage than Spain, Italy, Germany.
The U.S. has a great deal of teachers and support staff, 3.2M as teachers according to the National Center for Educational Statistics. There are a good number of teachers' aides in the classroom as well. The federal government employs 2M, excluding postal workers.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,996
US
#40
Most probably.

Question: how much would be the yearly tuition fee in a very good public uni/high school preparing translators/interpreters in US?
The cost for public university vary by state. Some states, like CA, offer a public education at a low cost. My state, PA, not so much, about $22,000 for the annual tuition alone.
 
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