Europeans were the ones who built modern New Zealand, so why so many Maori place names)

Sep 2016
508
天下
#11
What is the point of changing the name of Mt. Cook to Aoraki or adding a new Maori, when everyone already called it Mt. Cook for ages since the 19th century, or even coming up with a Maori name for New Zealand, when the old name was already known to everyone, and the Maoris never had a unified political entity over New Zealand anyway, it's stupid and smacks of PC.
Because while European settlers were calling it Mt. Cook, Maori kept calling it Aoraki. What's the problem with acknowledging it officially? Maori is an official language in New Zealand, along with English, so if anything it helps preserve the language and indigenous traditions among the Maori population. In Europe it is common to have double names of streets, towns, in mixed areas. New Zealand is an English name, so what's wrong with with inventing one for Maori? I really fail to see what you are upset about.

isn't london of roman origin?
If it was, it would easily analysable in Latin. Since it's not, Londinium must have been a latinised native toponym of sorts.
 

pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
8,663
#12
What is the point of changing the name of Mt. Cook to Aoraki or adding a new Maori, when everyone already called it Mt. Cook for ages since the 19th century, or even coming up with a Maori name for New Zealand, when the old name was already known to everyone, and the Maoris never had a unified political entity over New Zealand anyway, it's stupid and smacks of PC.
Because Maori names sound cooler.

Why does the unified political entity matter? It's an irrelevance.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
32,480
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#13
Singapore still retained the old British colonial place names even after 1965, and I favor that places that use Maori names continue to use Maori names, while places that have historically used European names continue to use European names, in the same way that Cape Town is still named as Cape Town.
It is not your decision to make or approve.
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,738
Western Eurasia
#14
It is certainly a nice and praiseworthy thing from the state of NZ they didn't let the native population to be totally marginalized, they rather embrace them and integrate their legacy to the general identity of the country. I don't find anything objectionable in it.
 

antocya

Ad Honorem
May 2012
5,744
Iraq
#15
I’m not so familiar with New Zealand place names except some of the really major ones.

In USA there are so many places named after European locations, my home state has a Paris, London, Glasgow, Athens, Manchester, Versailles (except this one everyone pronounces as ver sales).

It’s nice to have some variety.
 

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,709
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
#16
In the United States of America I am used to place names derived from many different languages.

I was born in Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Lancaster is named after a city and county in England.

As a child I lived on West Winona Street in Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Winona is an American Indian name. Germantown is an English name, named after settlers from Germany. Philadelphia is a Greek name, and it is named after a city in what is now Turkey. Pennsylvania, meaning "Penn's Woods" and combines the English surname Penn with the Latin word sylvania meaning forest. I used to walk down Wayne Avenue to reach the Fitler elementary school. Wayne is an English surname; the most famous Wayne in Pennsylvania was General "Mad" Anthony Wayne. Fitler is another English surname.

Later I lived in Jenkintown in Montgomery County. Jenkintown is named after Stephen Jenkins, an early Welsh settler. Montgomery County is named after either General Richard Montgomery or the county of Montgomeryshire in Wales.

Then I lived in Chalfont, In Bucks County. Chalfont is named after Chalfont St Giles, associated with William Penn, in Buckinghamshire in England. Bucks County is named after Bucks, the short name of Buckinghamshire in England.

And now I live in Perkasie in Bucks County. Perkasie is another American Indian name.

So I am used to place names with Indian names despite the fact that only about 1.6 percent of the total US population claimed to be entirely or partially Indian in the 2010 census. In New Zealand, roughly 15 percent of the population identified as Maori in the 2013 census, so I would expect that is would be proper for Maori place names to be almost ten times as common in New Zealand as American Indian place names are in the USA.

I don't approve of replacing long lasting English place names with Maori names, but giving places old or new Maori place names in addition to English names seems fitting. That would avoid the monotony of only English, Welsh, Scottish & Irish place names in New Zealand.
 
Likes: Ichon
Jun 2017
116
maine
#17
In the course of doing the maps for a mediaeval history PhD. (someone else's), I was told that a country's place names are apt to date way, way back--most often before the contemporary residents (who merely used names already recognizable).
 
Mar 2019
105
Victoria, Australia
#19
Well simply because humans are not very creative when it comes to naming things. The same names have been used for numerous cities, locations, etc.. for hundreds of years across multiples languages, cultures, religions, etc...

Australia, NZ's neighborhood brother, has a lot of place names from aboriginal names like "Wagga-wagga" or "Woolloomooloo". In fact I would say that the vaste majority of towns in Australia have some kind of aboriginal name -- inspired or otherwise.
 
Likes: specul8

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,029
Australia
#20
Yes, the local town near my location is named with an English version of a local Aboriginal name for the 'native cat' or 'spotted quoll'


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Further up the valley, closer to home it was named with an English name and further up the valley, and into the wilderness it is called 'Darkwood' .... I later found out a farmer named Darkwood had a farm up there :D

Most new things around here get a local Aboriginal name nowadays ; like new roads, reserves and National Parks.

Here is the 'big one' ;

Why Ayers Rock Was Changed Back to Uluru | Gray Line Blog