EZHAVAS OF KERALA WERE THE ANCIENT SRILANKAN TAMIL BUDDHISTS ?

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
4,983
India
Incorrect. "The origin of the Sanskrit word drāviḍa is tamiẓ ("Tamil")."
Dravidian people - Wikipedia

All Indians used to speak Dravidian before the Aryan Invasion.
Can you elaborate the word evolution of Tamizh into Dravida.

Also, the Andhras/Telugus, Kannadigas never referred themselves as Dravida until Robert Caldwell invented Dravidian identity.
 

kandal

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,815
USA
Can you elaborate the word evolution of Tamizh into Dravida.

Also, the Andhras/Telugus, Kannadigas never referred themselves as Dravida until Robert Caldwell invented Dravidian identity.
I am not the expert, but the quote in wiki references a Harvard uny. Press book.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,797
New Delhi, India
Wikipedia has nice information on early everything under the sun. I would not dismiss it in such a flippant way.
But Kendal, India is a large country, and when transportation was difficult and not necessary (with self-sufficient regions), it is absolutely impossible that the people spoke one language or even various dilects of one language. India has always been home to people coming in from all directions (including the Dravidians from God knows where) and there must always have been umpteen languages. It is said that even a small state like Nagaland spoke 500 languages.

"Each tribe has one or more dialects that are unintelligible to others. The major languages spoken as per the 2001 census are Ao (257,500), Konyak (248,002), Lotha (168,356), Angami (131,737), Phom (122,454), Sumi (92,884), Yimchungre (92,092), Sangtam (84,150), Chakru (83,506), Chang (62,347), Zeme (71,954, covering Zeliang, 61,492 and Zemi, 10,462), Bengali (58,890), Rengma (58,590), Hindi (56,981), Kheza (40,362), Khiamniungan (37,752), Nepali (24,222), Pochury (16,681), Kuki (16,846), Assamese (16,183) and Chakhesang (9,544)."
Nagaland - Wikipedia
 
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kandal

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,815
USA
Wikipedia has nice information on early everything under the sun. I would not dismiss it in such a flippant way.
But Kendal, India is a large country, and when transportation was difficult and not necessary (with self-sufficient regions), it is absolutely impossible that the people spoke one language or even various dilects of one language. India has always been home to people coming in from all directions (including the Dravidians from God knows where) and there must always have been umpteen languages. It is said that even a small state like Nagaland spoke 500 languages.

"Each tribe has one or more dialects that are unintelligible to others. The major languages spoken as per the 2001 census are Ao (257,500), Konyak (248,002), Lotha (168,356), Angami (131,737), Phom (122,454), Sumi (92,884), Yimchungre (92,092), Sangtam (84,150), Chakru (83,506), Chang (62,347), Zeme (71,954, covering Zeliang, 61,492 and Zemi, 10,462), Bengali (58,890), Rengma (58,590), Hindi (56,981), Kheza (40,362), Khiamniungan (37,752), Nepali (24,222), Pochury (16,681), Kuki (16,846), Assamese (16,183) and Chakhesang (9,544)."
Nagaland - Wikipedia
I also assume so too, Indians must have had different dialects of the same language family, or even different languages of the same family. When these people adopt a different language family, especially within a short time span, certain core features of the original language family continue to cling on, such as accent. A key feature of the Dravidian family is retroflex consonants which give a retroflex accent. This is not a feature of Indo-European tongues. But north Indians speak their Indo-European languages with a retroflex accent, closer to Dravidians. That is an indication that North Indians used to speak Dravidian.

Here is a quote from the book 'The wonder that was India" by historian A. L. Basham:
"All Indian languages, from Vedic to the modern vernaculars, contain a series of sounds, the retroflex or cerebral consonants, which cannot be traced in any other Indo-European tongues, not even in Old Iranian, which is closely akin to Sanskrit. These sounds must have developed quickly, from the efforts of non-Aryans to master the language of their conquerors." (p33)

"Dravidian is virtually an independent group of languages with a distinctive character. Its sound system is rich in retroflex consonants, which give it a crisp character, and its varied vowels distinguish it from the Northern languages -----"(p395)

Next time when Afghan leader like Karzai (though university educated in India) speak in English please pay attention to his accent. He doesn't have the Indian accent. This accent seems to disappear along the Afghan border.
 
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Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,797
New Delhi, India
Any reason or evidence for "Indians must have had different dialects of the same language family, or even different languages of the same family"? Why same family and why not different families of languages?
I do not think we are going to hear Karzai again, and Basham is just one opinion. How can the migrants from North-West or North-East in India may have had a language akin to Dravidian languages?
 
Apr 2019
410
India
I also assume so too, Indians must have had different dialects of the same language family, or even different languages of the same family. When these people adopt a different language family, especially within a short time span, certain core features of the original language family continue to cling on, such as accent. A key feature of the Dravidian family is retroflex consonants which give a retroflex accent. This is not a feature of Indo-European tongues. But north Indians speak their Indo-European languages with a retroflex accent, closer to Dravidians. That is an indication that North Indians used to speak Dravidian.

Here is a quote from the book 'The wonder that was India" by historian A. L. Basham:
"All Indian languages, from Vedic to the modern vernaculars, contain a series of sounds, the retroflex or cerebral consonants, which cannot be traced in any other Indo-European tongues, not even in Old Iranian, which is closely akin to Sanskrit. These sounds must have developed quickly, from the efforts of non-Aryans to master the language of their conquerors." (p33)

"Dravidian is virtually an independent group of languages with a distinctive character. Its sound system is rich in retroflex consonants, which give it a crisp character, and its varied vowels distinguish it from the Northern languages -----"(p395)

Next time when Afghan leader like Karzai (though university educated in India) speak in English please pay attention to his accent. He doesn't have the Indian accent. This accent seems to disappear along the Afghan border.
I'm not a linguist but lols.
Different Indian languages have myraids of retroflexes and 'Aryan' retroflexes are different from 'Dravidian' one. Vedik Sanskrit already had many retroflexes(some of them disappeared before period of classical Sanskrit). So I don't know what are you smoking?