Famous homosexual ancient Greeks and Romans

Sep 2016
801
Georgia
#61
Achilles also shows concern for other injured or fallen Greeks in the Iliad, If I remember correctly. When he asks Patroclus to check one of the injured warriors and whether it was his friend or not. He also lets Patroclus to take his armor and help Greeks against Trojans.

Antilochus, son of Nestor, was friend of Achilles and he was commissioned to announce death of Patroclus to Achilles. Achilles also avenges his death.
 
Sep 2014
801
Texas
#62
But they were not gay in the Iliad. It took a couple centuries for Achilles to become gay.

Actually he was also a pedophile, necrophiliac, gay rapist and murderer who was involved in two human sacrifices of young girls. I am inclined to think Homer tried to clear the name of a repugnant monster.

Oh, and there's a novel out about Briesis and Patroclus being lovers based on the Iliad.
 
Aug 2010
15,448
Welsh Marches
#63
"He" wasn't anything, he was a mythical figure about whom conflicting tales were recounted, one has to consider in what context they were recounted, and whether they belong to his standard mythology or were indeed deliberately revisonist. One simply cannot talk about mythical figures in this way as though they were historical characters, and use this anachronistic language in describing them! This thread is getting sillier and sillier. As though Homer were trying 'to clear the name of a repugnant monster' when all the tales that represent him as such were invented long after his death. Many fictional characters are presented in conflicting ways in different accounts, and one has to consider why that should be in each context; Menelaos is thus basically a noble character in Homer, but I the Attic tragedians, moved by anti-Spartan sentiment, often portray him as being thoroughly mean-minded.
 
Sep 2014
801
Texas
#64
"He" wasn't anything, he was a mythical figure about whom conflicting tales were recounted, one has to consider in what context they were recounted, and whether they belong to his standard mythology or were indeed deliberately revisonist. One simply cannot talk about mythical figures in this way as though they were historical characters, and use this anachronistic language in describing them! This thread is getting sillier and sillier. As though Homer were trying 'to clear the name of a repugnant monster' when all the tales that represent him as such were invented long after his death. Many fictional characters are presented in conflicting ways in different accounts, and one has to consider why that should be in each context; Menelaos is thus basically a noble character in Homer, but I the Attic tragedians, moved by anti-Spartan sentiment, often portray him as being thoroughly mean-minded.
Actually I did a detailed study of IE mythology and how it changed. This came about when I wrote time line for the horse. Achilles is CuChulainn is Rustam is a guy from India I can't pronounce. In an agrigarian society the king is the land, and the land is the king. This is why in a lot of ancient IE cultures, while homosexuality certainly existed, there are no gay myths. A king or Lord of the fort were gay, the land would not produce. When the Greeks adopted sedentary city ways, it became possible for people to make their God's and heroes in their own image. Want to have sex with a dead woman? It's ok because Achilles did it. Want to rape a young man trying to escape you...no problem Achilles did it.

The sacrifice of Polyxena harkens back to the time when all heroes were accompanied into the afterlife by a woman. I wonder if Briesis was also killed? If there had been any doubt an army if beautiful boys would have been slaughtered at his tomb.

Civilization and leaving the agrigarian society behind made it possible for gay myths to arise.

I've also got thoughts on Ganymedes. and
 

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