Favourite Emperor of the Sixth and Seventh Centuries (491-695)

Who are your favourite emperors from the years AD 491-695 (up to two choices)?

  • Anastasius I

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Justin I

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Justinian I

    Votes: 6 85.7%
  • Justin II

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Tiberius II

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Maurice

    Votes: 1 14.3%
  • Theodosius (Son of Maurice)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Phocas

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Heraclius

    Votes: 6 85.7%
  • Constantine III (Heraclian Dynasty)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Heraklonas

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Constans II

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Constantine IV

    Votes: 1 14.3%
  • Heraclius & Tiberius (Sons of Constans II)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Justinian II

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    7
#1
As with the previous three polls, you can choose an emperor because you admire them, because you find them interesting or for entertainment value.

You can choose up to two emperors.

I'm not sure I will produce polls for emperors later than the seventh century. In my mind, the seventh century is a watershed period with the rise of Islam, the fall of Roman Egypt and the fall of Persia. That being said, I'd be happy to produce polls for later emperors (in the Post-Classical forum) if there is call for it.

In any case, I'm going to give people more time to vote on the various polls (since votes keep coming in), and I will eventually bring together the two most popular emperors from each poll into a single 'all-stars' poll. That way, Augustus and Vespasian can go up against Hadrian, Marcus Aurelius, Aurelian, Julian, and other emperors who have received a good amount of votes in a good old-fashioned best-of-the-best popularity contest.
 
#3
Hopefully someone will vote for an emperor other than Justinian and Heraclius haha. However, I too voted for Justinian and Heraclius. I like Justinian in the same way that I like Augustus, Diocletian and Constantine: He was a hands-on emperor who changed the empire that he was ruling in significant ways. As for Heraclius, I voted for his reign on the grounds that it was such a watershed period.
 
Feb 2011
920
Scotland
#5
Hard to avoid Justinian- he had such a lot happening!

Heraclius another military chap with amazing swings of fortune.

But I plumped for Constantine IV with his ability to hold ground and even leaving Constantinople to hold through siege and for being the last emperor to strike solidi with busts in the style used since the late fourth century,
 
Sep 2013
596
Oakville, Ontario
#6
Justinian I was the last Roman Emperor who spoke Latin as a native language, though it was still widely used in the court and official business. His rule saw the final attempt to revive the West and reunify the ancient Empire. The generals that he had under his command (Narses and especially Belisarius) were the very best of the age, and they accomplished miracles for their Emperor. If it wasn't for the Plague and the interference from Persia, he might've seriously recovered the West; at the conclusion of his reign he already had control of Africa and Italy and was making inroads into Spain. His construction in Constantinople shaped it, giving it the Hagia Sophia and the incredible Basilica Cistern. He was the most influential Emperor of the sixth century, and indeed, maybe even of all the Byzantine Emperors. His legal code, the Codex Iuris Civilis, remains the basis for modern European law.

Heraclius I was the Emperor who introduced Greek as an official language, making the Empire truly Byzantine going forth from this point. He was a very capable ruler, and a great general who reformed the military, though his reign began with a crisis, the Byzantine Empire being assaulted on all sides. But he was able to pull things back from the very brink of defeat to victory over Persia, the effort being worthy of the same Roman resilience displayed during the Punic Wars. If he had died at that point, he would've been remembered one of the greatest Roman Emperors ever. But the Muslim Conquests happened. The dismantling of the Byzantine Empire (to say nothing of the utter conquest of Persia, weakened by years of struggle) by Islamic forces cast a shadow over the final years of his rule, Egypt falling as he died in Constantinople in 641 CE.
 
#7
Justinian I was the last Roman Emperor who spoke Latin as a native language, though it was still widely used in the court and official business. His rule saw the final attempt to revive the West and reunify the ancient Empire. The generals that he had under his command (Narses and especially Belisarius) were the very best of the age, and they accomplished miracles for their Emperor. If it wasn't for the Plague and the interference from Persia, he might've seriously recovered the West; at the conclusion of his reign he already had control of Africa and Italy and was making inroads into Spain. His construction in Constantinople shaped it, giving it the Hagia Sophia and the incredible Basilica Cistern. He was the most influential Emperor of the sixth century, and indeed, maybe even of all the Byzantine Emperors. His legal code, the Codex Iuris Civilis, remains the basis for modern European law.

Heraclius I was the Emperor who introduced Greek as an official language, making the Empire truly Byzantine going forth from this point. He was a very capable ruler, and a great general who reformed the military, though his reign began with a crisis, the Byzantine Empire being assaulted on all sides. But he was able to pull things back from the very brink of defeat to victory over Persia, the effort being worthy of the same Roman resilience displayed during the Punic Wars. If he had died at that point, he would've been remembered one of the greatest Roman Emperors ever. But the Muslim Conquests happened. The dismantling of the Byzantine Empire (to say nothing of the utter conquest of Persia, weakened by years of struggle) by Islamic forces cast a shadow over the final years of his rule, Egypt falling as he died in Constantinople in 641 CE.
A fantastic summary of these two emperors.
 

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