Female Viking warriors: truth or fiction?

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
4,932
Australia
The skills of those holding the weapons also counts. I doubt Japanese had poor quality iron ore and carbonised steel, as the well technology ie using two types of steel on different sides of the blade. In general , Japanese didn't have a good opinion about swords from other cultures. Some Katana swords were of a poor quality, especially those mass made during WWII that were brought home by Americans as trophies.

Here's a good documentary on how Katana sword is made on National Geographic. Three teams (metal makers, sword makers and polisher - 50 people) . The sword was completed in 6 months. Such sword cost a fortune and it's not sold just to anyone who wishes.
And even after all this work, their functionality is barely the equivalent of a good European sword. Ask yourself why the Japanese had to place so much emphasis on correct technique. It is because of how fragile their swords are. A decent European sword is not so easy to damage and is far more forgiving of incorrect technique.
 
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Dec 2017
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And even after all this work, their functionality is barely the equivalent of a good European sword. Ask yourself why the Japanese had to place so much emphasis on correct technique. It is because of how fragile their swords are. A decent European sword is not so easy to damage and is far more forgiving of incorrect technique.
They weren't fragile. Why do you think they were fragile? They were flexible from the middle or 3/4 to out outer edge able to absorb brute force made on one type of steel. And very hard on inner edge able to cut being razor sharp made from another type of steel. Two or three Europeans knowing everything about swords are also stating Japanese Katana swords are best ever made in the documentary. The design and technology in making swords were perfected over many centuries.
 
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Did Samurai fight with National Geographic's swords. You must present ancient Japanese sword of top quality
The national geographic the documentary is about making the Katana sword in a traditional way. In the past only Samurai could wear swords in public. They were aristocrats. Farmers grew rice for them, artists performed for them. Spiritual people prayed for them. Of course, they had quality swords.
 
Jan 2014
1,112
Rus
The national geographic the documentary is about making the Katana sword in a traditional way. In the past only Samurai could wear swords in public. They were aristocrats. Farmers grew rice for them, artists performed for them. Spiritual people prayed for them. Of course, they had quality swords.
Did some of these old Japanese super swords preserve? May be in some museums?
 
Dec 2017
801
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Did some of these old Japanese super swords preserve? May be in some museums?
From old days? Perhaps. I posted an URL link to the documentary how Katana sword was made in a traditional way. From start (excavating iron ore from known places) to finish (polishing and sharpening) . PS Even their quality sharpening stones cost several thousand dollars each an a sharpener is well respected in the community.
 

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
4,932
Australia
There is no such thing as a Japanese super sword. The mechanical properties of their best swords are no better than a typical European or Middle Eastern sword. They simply didn't have the raw materials required to make a superior blade. You need ores that contain just the right levels of vanadium, molybdenum, chromium, manganese, etc. It doesn't matter how good the smith is if he doesn't have the right materials.

The only thing that is "super" about a Japanese sword is the level of hype.
 
Mar 2013
1,039
Breakdancing on the Moon.
There is no such thing as a Japanese super sword. The mechanical properties of their best swords are no better than a typical European sword. They simply didn't have the raw materials required to make a superior blade. You need ores that contain just the right levels of vanadium, molybdenum, chromium, manganese, etc. It doesn't matter how good the smith is if he doesn't have the right materials.

The only thing that is "super" about a Japanese sword is the level of hype.
If anything, the steel was worse. You don't go through the process of making tamihagane (spelling?) if you have access to good iron.
 
Dec 2017
801
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There is no such thing as a Japanese super sword. The mechanical properties of their best swords are no better than a typical European sword. They simply didn't have the raw materials required to make a superior blade. You need ores that contain just the right levels of vanadium, molybdenum, chromium, manganese, etc. It doesn't matter how good the smith is if he doesn't have the right materials.

The only thing that is "super" about a Japanese sword is the level of hype.
I wasn't describing them as super swords. I was writing they were the best given available technology at the time. Yes, modern allyos are created for different types of blades. By the the way modern day Japanese knives are the best too. Whether they are kitchen knives or knives for specific use. And steel for knives too. You may find 50-60 knives in a specialised kitchen. Traditionally, Japanese are good at it.
 

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
4,932
Australia
It has nothing to do with the the technology. Europeans were making better swords using similar techniques a thousand years earlier.
It has nothing to do with modern alloys. The required elements are found in naturally-occurring ores. Japan's problem is that it never had any appropriate ores.

Considering the crappy ores they had to work with, Japanese smiths worked wonders, but compared to the best swords from other countries, Japanese swords were mediocre. We have surviving European swords from the La Tene period, swords that have been under water for over two thousand years, that can still be bent almost double and flex back to their original shape.

And no, Japanese kitchen knives are not the best. They just have the best marketing campaigns. The mechanical properties of their best knives are no different to the best knives from other countries.
 
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Dec 2017
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It has nothing to do with the the technology. Europeans were making better swords using similar techniques two thousand years earlier.
It has nothing to do with modern alloys. The required elements are found in naturally-occurring ores. Japan's problem is that they never had any.

Considering the crappy ores they had to work with, Japanese smiths worked wonders, but compared to the best swords from other countries, Japanese swords were mediocre. We have surviving European swords from the La Tene period, swords that have been under water for over two thousand years, that can still be bent almost double and flex back to their original shape.

And no, Japanese kitchen knives are not the best. They just have the best marketing campaigns. The mechanical properties of their best knives are no different to the best knives from other countries.
What marketing ? I was referring to custom made knives made by masters for whom there are long queues. I recommend you to read on the subject or discuss the subject on specialised forums. There's no point arguing with you here.