Flood the Sahara

Jul 2016
7,744
USA
#21
The only viable way of reclaiming the desert is currently being done by Israel. It requires generations of planning and a multi-pronged approach.
50 Years Ago: The Reclamation of a Man-Made Desert
10 top ways Israel fights desertification

Israel is the only country in the last century to see a net increase in the number of trees.
But they stole the water from the Arabs!

Seriously, that's what would happen in Africa. One tribe or nation would get more benefit than another. Not enough kickbacks would get paid. Someone would declare shenanigans because the evil other guy is stealing their water, causing horrific misery, especially among the children.

Suddenly Times and Newsweek are running cover stories, the world is demanding action to help them. The UN has to intervene in another African conflict, which always ends very badly.
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
2,531
Australia
#23
No, dig a canal *a thousand MILES* wide across Africa! Then build bridges and tunnels across it. Including a couple for hypersonic trains. They're cheap and easy to build and everyone will use them.

(Oh, I shouldn't have said that...)

Matthew

And faster than light hover cars .... dont forget to include the faster than light hover cards.

But really, I am shutting down all human mega environmental projects until you all get more responsible !

The Russians had a great idea in Central Asia ; have you seen the giant canal project to bring water to the deserts there and cause a magnificent agricultural boom, feed the hungry, create arable land and turn the whole area around economically by channeling water from Amu Darya River.

....

The building of canals and channels for irrigation in Turkmenistan began in the 1930s. In 1929, the Bassaga-Kerkinskiy Canal was completed at a length of 100 km. The development of the outlet design for the Amu Darya began in 1932. The design was to bring water from the Amu Darya across Turkmenistan to the coast of the Caspian Sea to irrigate the Karakum Desert. The project was supported by Hydrologist V. Tsinzerling, who estimated the volume of water taken from the river to be around 17-35 cu km, which, according to estimations, should not have injured the economy of Uzbekistan or the ecology of the Aral Sea. It was intended to fill Sarykamysskoe Lake and to take from 30 to 50 cubic kilometers per year for 4 to 8 years. This version was approved by the State Planning Committee of the USSR in 1932. The second plan was chosen. The length of the canal was to be more than 1200 kilometers, beginning from Takhiatash, a town/city in Uzbekistan, then extended 10 km from the town of Nukus to Krasnovodsk on the Caspian Coast of Turkmenistan

After Stalin's death in 1953, construction of the Main Turkmen Canal ceased. In 1954 construction of the Qaraqum Canal began, along a route far to the south. It stretches 1300 km and irrigates a substantial part of Turkmenistan, and remains the most important canal in Turkmenistan.

Construction of Qaraqum Canal drained the Amu-Darya river and therefore enabled huge areas to be opened for cotton production. Nevertheless, it also resulted in the destruction of the native riparian tugai forests, and greatly diminished the inflow of water to the Aral Sea, which caused great ecological catastrophe. - Wiki.

1550001988908.png
Aral 'Sea' .


1550002336785.png
 
Oct 2012
449
#24
No, dig a canal *a thousand MILES* wide across Africa! Then build bridges and tunnels across it. Including a couple for hypersonic trains. They're cheap and easy to build and everyone will use them.

(Oh, I shouldn't have said that...)

Matthew
That should be connected with the cross ocean bridge network.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,264
Brassicaland
#25
And faster than light hover cars .... dont forget to include the faster than light hover cards.

But really, I am shutting down all human mega environmental projects until you all get more responsible !

The Russians had a great idea in Central Asia ; have you seen the giant canal project to bring water to the deserts there and cause a magnificent agricultural boom, feed the hungry, create arable land and turn the whole area around economically by channeling water from Amu Darya River.

....

The building of canals and channels for irrigation in Turkmenistan began in the 1930s. In 1929, the Bassaga-Kerkinskiy Canal was completed at a length of 100 km. The development of the outlet design for the Amu Darya began in 1932. The design was to bring water from the Amu Darya across Turkmenistan to the coast of the Caspian Sea to irrigate the Karakum Desert. The project was supported by Hydrologist V. Tsinzerling, who estimated the volume of water taken from the river to be around 17-35 cu km, which, according to estimations, should not have injured the economy of Uzbekistan or the ecology of the Aral Sea. It was intended to fill Sarykamysskoe Lake and to take from 30 to 50 cubic kilometers per year for 4 to 8 years. This version was approved by the State Planning Committee of the USSR in 1932. The second plan was chosen. The length of the canal was to be more than 1200 kilometers, beginning from Takhiatash, a town/city in Uzbekistan, then extended 10 km from the town of Nukus to Krasnovodsk on the Caspian Coast of Turkmenistan

After Stalin's death in 1953, construction of the Main Turkmen Canal ceased. In 1954 construction of the Qaraqum Canal began, along a route far to the south. It stretches 1300 km and irrigates a substantial part of Turkmenistan, and remains the most important canal in Turkmenistan.

Construction of Qaraqum Canal drained the Amu-Darya river and therefore enabled huge areas to be opened for cotton production. Nevertheless, it also resulted in the destruction of the native riparian tugai forests, and greatly diminished the inflow of water to the Aral Sea, which caused great ecological catastrophe. - Wiki.

View attachment 15549
Aral 'Sea' .


View attachment 15550
It was an awful idea to begin with; this area has always be arid, and diverting the water for agriculture was ill-planned at least.
 
Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
#26
It was an awful idea to begin with; this area has always be arid, and diverting the water for agriculture was ill-planned at least.
As far as I know, canal irrigation always been problematic due to the salt problem.

In Australia there is some drip irrigation used on grape vines to help with the salt problem and minimise water use.
 
#27
Israel is the only country in the last century to see a net increase in the number of trees
Not true. In 1492 the US was an estimated 45% covered in forests. It decreased as the country was settled and developed, reaching the low point in about 1900. The amount of forest has risen steadily since, to the present day ~33%.
 

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