Frankish Empire: An empire of Germanic barbarians?

Peter Graham

Ad Honorem
Jan 2014
2,648
Westmorland
Prior to the barbarian "invasions," I do not know what colloquial languages were common among the Gallo-Romans. Maybe someone on here does.
Latin was the primary spoken and written language of the Gallo-Romans. It existed in its classical form but also in a myriad of regional, low Latin forms - essentially local Latin dialects.

The ancestors of languages such as Basque seem to ave existed in the south of what is now France.

There is a big debate amongst French academics as to whether or not Gaulish survived into the post-Roman period. Gaulish was a Celtic language related to British, the ancestor of modern Welsh, Cornish et al. Some believe that modern Breton is a development of Gaulish, others that Gaulish had died out during the Roman period and the Breton language was an import from post-Roman Britain.
 
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authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
5,219
Prior to the barbarian "invasions," I do not know what colloquial languages were common among the Gallo-Romans. Maybe someone on here does.
Gaulish gave way to vulgar latin, the language of the belgae gave way to low germanic and the aquitanians continued to speak basque in some parts. Gaulish may have persisted in Amorica but eventually gave way to Britonnic.

The Oaths of Strasbourg record the language used in the 9th century. It uses Medieval Latin, Old Gallo-Romance and Old High German.
 

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,972
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
Prior to the barbarian "invasions," I do not know what colloquial languages were common among the Gallo-Romans. Maybe someone on here does.
Latin was the primary spoken and written language of the Gallo-Romans. It existed in its classical form but also in a myriad of regional, low Latin forms - essentially local Latin dialects.

The ancestors of languages such as Basque seem to ave existed in the south of what is now France.

There is a big debate amongst French academics as to whether or not Gaulish survived into the post-Roman period. Gaulish was a Celtic language related to British, the ancestor of modern Welsh, Cornish et al. Some believe that modern Breton is a development of Gaulish, others that Gaulish had died out during the Roman period and the Breton language was an import from post-Roman Britain.
Gaulish gave way to vulgar latin, the language of the belgae gave way to low germanic and the aquitanians continued to speak basque in some parts. Gaulish may have persisted in Amorica but eventually gave way to Britonnic.

The Oaths of Strasbourg record the language used in the 9th century. It uses Medieval Latin, Old Gallo-Romance and Old High German.
I may add that the History of the Franks by Gregory of Tours describes the formal entrance of a Merovingian king into a city, possibly Gregory's own Tours. The king was greeted in separate formal greetings in the separate languages of the various ethic groups in the city - the Gallo-Romans, the Jews, and the Syrians.
 
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Dreamhunter

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
7,486
Malaysia
I keep the bold text, as the other 3 paragraphs are either completely irrelevant to the issue (3rd paragraph refers to things that happened 500-1000 years after Franks and some of them have nothing to do with even the descendants of Franks either) or, regarding development, development in the ancient world surely isn't something measurable but anyone without asperger syndrom can understand that colloseum is a sign of development compare to, let's say, nordic longhouse.

So back to the bold part, didn't ancient germanics have stone buildings? Or writing (runes)? Because i think in both questions the answer is yes
Why does a building of wood have to be considered as inferior to & less civilised than one of stone? It takes as much skill, craftsmanship & artistry, indeed quite likely much more, to build a wooden building that can stand the test of time & weather.

And why the reference to Asperger's Syndrome? Likening or relating something to an unfortunate medical condition is not a sign of civilised or mature discussion, I don't think.?
 
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authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
5,219
People build using the local materials. In Northern Germany that means an abundance of trees. Many of these buildings last for centuries. The bricks are painted onto a wattle and daub infill.



Copy of Dsc00106.jpg
 
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Apr 2010
1,046
evergreen state, USA
I recently read that even using fork to eat was introduced in Frankish empire by the Eastern Roman empress Theofano as late as in 973, and taking that as a "sample", I was wondering, was the lifestyle of Frankish citizens from 5th to 10th century AD really different and significantly more developed than that of ancient Germanic Barbarian paganists of Roman times, like Goths etc?

The point of the title: There is a tendency of de-Germanization of Frankish empire and an attempt to be presented as a "new Rome" or something "multicultural" and somewhat developed like the Roman empire, but i think that it has nothing to do with reality, which (reality) is that Frankish empire was just a confederation of kinda primitive Germanic tribes with hardy any other difference from their ancestors than religion
In my grandiose tree, I have Empress Consort Anastasia Theophano, 941-1027, as the great grandmother of Anna Yaroslavna, 1036-1074, who married Henry I Capet of France. That's not to say this placement is without controversy.