Franks in Britain

authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
4,950
#22
That would make sense with the date 680-700. It's at the start of the anglo saxon mission to the Germans. They were sponsored by the Frank. Willibrord for example died in Echternach.

Ecclesiastical contacts had started much earlier. In Bede's history, he mentions Peter, a bishop of Canterbury drowning in the Bay of Wissant and being buried by the villagers of Ambleteuse (Amflete) in 607.
 
Likes: Isleifson

authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
4,950
#23
I'm very glad you know what it's all about
It's a beer associated with Cologne but is also a measure, 0.2 litres, served in a tall glass. The idea is to drink it down in one or two gulps. Young men, 'junge', do this quite a lot. My flatmate in Koblenz downed 84 one day between 10am and 12.00 midnight.

Huge quantities are drunk during the Carnival period which runs from thursday night until midnight shrove tuesday. Then it is Lent. It's one big party for 5 days.
 
Last edited:
Apr 2017
110
Cologne
#24
A bit complicated. But for sure you are a Kölsche Jong;)
lol - Yeah that is true as well. I am today on a party – I will tell that based on that post you (as a Luxembourgian) called me out on that. That will make a good laugh and a good conversation, because my brother's gf is a true-born, proud anglo-saxon girl. Someone, if you tell her that thread title she can go in a room full of Rhenish Germans: "Because we got there first. We discovered it. We discovered everything. We are explorers. Travelers. We are people of the sea. The closest you got into foreign lands is out of eye-sight of the Cologne cathedral." ^^

It's a beer associated with Cologne but is also a measure, 0.2 litres, served in a tall glass. The idea is to drink it down in one or two gulps. Young men, 'junge', do this quite a lot. My flatmate in Koblenz downed 84 one day between 10am and 12.00 midnight.
Huge quantities are drunk during the Carnival period which runs from thursday night until midnight shrove tuesday. Then it is Lent. It's one big party for 5 days.
I really do not hope that Isleifson called me a young beer or tried to imply I am on carnival or drunk. As otherwise I would go now: Less name calling – more arguments, Mister.^^
He called me a Koelsche Jung – that means you are a true native, because I give and gave this away in my remarks.
As you can be Colognian or a Colognian native. Those are two different things.

Your flatmate f.e. if you tell me he drank 84 glasses in 12 hours – I can tell on that, that he is no Colognian native. That is not how we drink Koelsch, only immigrants (so everybody else who is not native) and tourists do this.

And Jung or Junge translates literally to 'boy' or 'young-men', but that is not what it means.
That is a common misconception in German, because for others this can be misunderstood as a down-grade, a boy is somebody young, naive, inexperienced - not a man.

(!) While - in Ripuarian the words change their meaning, based on who says what to who; what is their relationship to each other and about what are they talking.
So the literally meaning of the words is not important, but the circumstances how you use them.

That is why, if in carnival they go: Cologne boys, Cologne girls!
Then this does not mean: Young people; or people that are young on mind; or people who pretend to be young – it translates to: Male and female natives(!) of Cologne.

As our carnival is originally a festival of resistance against the Prussian rule (it does not look like that anymore). What we do here (originally) is to reenact the coming of Napoleon to Cologne.
That is why it is so local patriotic and very misunderstood even in Germany.
Cologne Alaaf – translates to: Cologne above everything in the world.
And comes from a time as Germans began to sing: Germany, Germany above everything in the world.

They took an old phrase – other Germans would not understand ( see above how the language works – we do this all the time – we have a perfect example here how easy it can lead to something totally different) – and cried it into their face.
And other guys of the culture zone, but not Ripuarian – used military shouts.
That is why our carnival along the Rhine looks different from the one in the south.

That is why I once made that unfair joking comment to you – about your Swabian(?) carnival. As ours has a totally different meaning. It is like saying to a Brazilian you do carnival wrong.^^
What has a Brazilian to do with the separation from Germany, by going 'Napoleon, our hero!' ? Nothing, right? Now you can smile about my comment to you back then, too. :)

So: Next time somebody says Koelsche Jung - you do not think beer, please, or I have to put 'No food' in my signature - that nobody gets here stupid ideas and tries to eat me.
Here are people from all over the world - you have no idea what kind of stuff they eat - and if they read in connection to Germany about Berliners and Hamburgers and Frankfurters now Koelsch - they might think we are a buffet. We do have a chocolate museum in Cologne and our sweet smell is sold around the planet in parfume bottles. So careful what you put out into the world.

So please do not eat Colognians, world. Thank you very much!
Take a speculaas instead. That is Colognian that can be eaten. No. I do not know if they come from here - but ours are top of the line. You never paid so much for a biscuit. Bon appetit.
 
Last edited:

authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
4,950
#25
That is why I once made that unfair joking comment to you – about your Swabian(?) carnival. As ours has a totally different meaning. It is like saying to a Brazilian you do carnival wrong.^^
I know both Karneval from my time in Koblenz and Schwäbisch Alemannisches Fastnacht from my time down there and yes, they are different. It's not just the costumes used in the parades but, whilst the fastnacht parades are big and well attended, most people go home afterwards. In the Rheinland, in addition to the parades, it one big street party in the centre.
 

Isleifson

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
3,632
Lorraine tudesque
#26
That would make sense with the date 680-700. It's at the start of the anglo saxon mission to the Germans. They were sponsored by the Frank. Willibrord for example died in Echternach.

Ecclesiastical contacts had started much earlier. In Bede's history, he mentions Peter, a bishop of Canterbury drowning in the Bay of Wissant and being buried by the villagers of Ambleteuse (Amflete) in 607.
Willibrord and the anglo saxon mission was not only important for the Germans , but for the Franks too.
There were many pagan things in the faith of the Franks. Willibrord has been fighting against all that.

For example this Menhir who was christianized by Willibrord.

Frabillenkreuz - etymologische Wortbestimmung Datenbank der Kulturgüter in der Region Trier
 
Likes: authun

Isleifson

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
3,632
Lorraine tudesque
#27
lol - Yeah that is true as well. I am today on a party – I will tell that based on that post you (as a Luxembourgian) called me out on that. That will make a good laugh and a good conversation, because my brother's gf is a true-born, proud anglo-saxon girl. Someone, if you tell her that thread title she can go in a room full of Rhenish Germans: "Because we got there first. We discovered it. We discovered everything. We are explorers. Travelers. We are people of the sea. The closest you got into foreign lands is out of eye-sight of the Cologne cathedral." ^^



I really do not hope that Isleifson called me a young beer or tried to imply I am on carnival or drunk. As otherwise I would go now: Less name calling – more arguments, Mister.^^
He called me a Koelsche Jung – that means you are a true native, because I give and gave this away in my remarks.
As you can be Colognian or a Colognian native. Those are two different things.

Your flatmate f.e. if you tell me he drank 84 glasses in 12 hours – I can tell on that, that he is no Colognian native. That is not how we drink Koelsch, only immigrants (so everybody else who is not native) and tourists do this.

And Jung or Junge translates literally to 'boy' or 'young-men', but that is not what it means.
That is a common misconception in German, because for others this can be misunderstood as a down-grade, a boy is somebody young, naive, inexperienced - not a man.

(!) While - in Ripuarian the words change their meaning, based on who says what to who; what is their relationship to each other and about what are they talking.
So the literally meaning of the words is not important, but the circumstances how you use them.

That is why, if in carnival they go: Cologne boys, Cologne girls!
Then this does not mean: Young people; or people that are young on mind; or people who pretend to be young – it translates to: Male and female natives(!) of Cologne.

As our carnival is originally a festival of resistance against the Prussian rule (it does not look like that anymore). What we do here (originally) is to reenact the coming of Napoleon to Cologne.
That is why it is so local patriotic and very misunderstood even in Germany.
Cologne Alaaf – translates to: Cologne above everything in the world.
And comes from a time as Germans began to sing: Germany, Germany above everything in the world.

They took an old phrase – other Germans would not understand ( see above how the language works – we do this all the time – we have a perfect example here how easy it can lead to something totally different) – and cried it into their face.
And other guys of the culture zone, but not Ripuarian – used military shouts.
That is why our carnival along the Rhine looks different from the one in the south.

That is why I once made that unfair joking comment to you – about your Swabian(?) carnival. As ours has a totally different meaning. It is like saying to a Brazilian you do carnival wrong.^^
What has a Brazilian to do with the separation from Germany, by going 'Napoleon, our hero!' ? Nothing, right? Now you can smile about my comment to you back then, too. :)

So: Next time somebody says Koelsche Jung - you do not think beer, please, or I have to put 'No food' in my signature - that nobody gets here stupid ideas and tries to eat me.
Here are people from all over the world - you have no idea what kind of stuff they eat - and if they read in connection to Germany about Berliners and Hamburgers and Frankfurters now Koelsch - they might think we are a buffet. We do have a chocolate museum in Cologne and our sweet smell is sold around the planet in parfume bottles. So careful what you put out into the world.

So please do not eat Colognians, world. Thank you very much!
Take a speculaas instead. That is Colognian that can be eaten. No. I do not know if they come from here - but ours are top of the line. You never paid so much for a biscuit. Bon appetit.
Well your language is Rheinfränkisch , my language is Moselfränkisch.

But for sure the Prussian should stay on the Schäl Sick;)
 
Apr 2017
110
Cologne
#28
Well your language is Rheinfränkisch , my language is Moselfränkisch.
Of course. That is why I always write three/FOUR Frankish cultures, because you are actually culture-wise Rhine-Franks that split up and went later more west, while you speak Mosel-Frankish.
But there is a difference between you and other Mosel-Franks. I directly knew what you mean and why you could say this. :)

I know both Karneval from my time in Koblenz and Schwäbisch Alemannisches Fastnacht from my time down there and yes, they are different. It's not just the costumes used in the parades but, whilst the fastnacht parades are big and well attended, most people go home afterwards. In the Rheinland, in addition to the parades, it one big street party in the centre.
I understand you. But, please, for your own sake don't say to other people from carnival hot-spots, specifically from Cologne: "I participated in the Koblenz carnival I know the differences." again.^^

There is so much more going on than just a party or a parade and Koblenz is really not Cologne. That is why originally it became so popular for other Germans – but now is a sell-out and the media is not helping.
They have to combine being public broadcasting stations that run on the laws of the Federal Republic of Germany with such an event. And in my opinion failed horribly, because their solution was to water it down on that party-level like an Oktoberfest that resulted now into the situation, that you have as good as no locals anymore in the carnival on popular events.

A perfect story to this (fresh from RL): A few days ago a woman from East-Germany went onto the stage, because she felt insulted by the comedy speech. She says she attends carnival for multiple years, but she had zero awareness about, that she just went into a Chinese restaurant, because she loves Chinese food – tossed the bowl with rice on the floor and went: Put some potatoes inside!
As for her carnival is like a comedy show/party and these guys on stage are like stand up comedians that are open for discussion about topics.

So locals try to evade such and stick to their crowd where much more is going on and I doubt that you sang in Koblenz that you are born at the Rhine in Cologne and have not lost your mother tongue and that is something you are proud of, in a crowd that took this like a national hymn of the Vatican during the crowning of the pope.^^
But that is something you imply if you say such to guys from such carnival hot-spots, specifically from Cologne and they will judge you on that. And with Koblenz, - that is not the best back up.

In carnival you have 'sacral moments' and tears, too. It is not just party and Ha-Ha with 84 glasses of beer. Such stuff is the reason why nobody of my family will be at the sidewalk during the parade on Monday. And how should I argue to cannibal Joe, that he can not eat humans here and has to adjust while Hubert from Frankfurt waves his beer-glass next to me and chants: The Water of Cologne is good!^^
(That is a song about water-polution, but most people think it is about beer, because they do not understand the lyrics). So fair rules for everybody.
 

authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
4,950
#29
I understand you. But, please, for your own sake don't say to other people from carnival hot-spots, specifically from Cologne:
I mentioned the carnival in Cologne to a woman serving at a german christmas market in Leeds in the UK. She was not amused. She was from Düsseldorf.
 

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