French emigrants in USA (1792-1800)

May 2017
1,160
France
Hello everybody and dear specialists.How many french political emigrants have passed in the USA during the Revolution ? Thank you.
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,479
Dispargum
Very few. I've done a little reading on immigration patterns but have not heard of that one. I would think that French people wanting to live in a democracy at that time would stay in France while French people who did not want to live in a democracy would flee France to almost anywhere but the US.

People of French extraction are one of the smaller ethnic groups in the US. Among European groups the British, Irish, Germans, Italians, Poles, and Scandinavians are all much larger groups. Most Franco-Americans first settled in New Orleans several decades prior to the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, or were Huguenots fleeing Louis XIV, or were Quebecers who drifted south into Maine and New Hampshire.
 
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May 2017
1,160
France
Thank you very much.Have you heard speaking about a little group of french royalists living in Philadelphia:marques Du Puy-Rochefort etc...
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,479
Dispargum
When you first mentioned 15% I thought that was high, but thinking about it a little longer, there were a few families with French names in my childhood neighborhood. The French in Philadelphia are not a strong ethnic group. They don't keep their own traditions or celebrate their own holidays. I do not recall any French restaurants from the old neighborhood. One of the families with a French surname went to my Protestant church. In my old neighborhood there were three Catholic Churches, each one catering to a different ethnic group - the Germans, Italians, and Poles each had their own church. Most of those churches have closed over the past forty years. The old ethnic affiliations have disappeared. But even fifty years ago, the French were just Anglo-Saxons with unusual last names. In Philadelphia supermarkets you can still buy German food like scrapple, but I've never heard of French food being sold in Supermarkets. The best evidence of French assimilation is that I had to be reminded that French surnames even existed in Philadelphia.
 
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Scaeva

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
5,630
Following the end of the Napoleonic Wars some of the Bonapartists ended up in the United States...


Demopolis was founded after the fall of Napoleon's Empire and named by a group of French expatriates, a mix of exiled Bonapartists and other French migrants who had settled in the United States after the overthrow of the colonial government in Saint-Domingue following the failed Saint-Domingue expedition. The name, meaning in Greek "the People's City" or "City of the People" (from Ancient Greek δῆμος + πόλις), was chosen to honor the democratic ideals behind the endeavor. First settled in 1817, it is one of the oldest continuous settlements in Alabama.[9][10] It was incorporated on December 11, 1821.[11]."
Demopolis, Alabama - Wikipedia

Champ d'Asile ("Field of Asylum") was a short-lived settlement founded in Texas in January 1818 by 20 French Bonapartistveterans of the Napoleonic Wars from the Vine and Olive Colony. The party was led by General Charles Lallemand. Land was offered to French settlers on March 3, 1817, after a vote by the United States Congress. Champ d'Asile was situated along the Trinity River and was abandoned in July of the same year.

Lallemand, a Bonapartist General, was accompanied by his brother, Baron Charles François Antoine Lallemand. The colony was to bring some military men for protection, and concentrate on agricultural work, cultivating grapes and olives. 100 officers joined Lallemand, and around a quarter to a third of these were foreigners of the Grande Armée; the rest were French.[1]Lallemand financed the project through land speculation. On December 17, 1817 150 of the would-be-settlers sailed from Philadelphia for Galveston, Texas, where they arrived on January 14. Lallemand and the other colonists convened in New Orleans, and on March 10 left for Galveston with 120 volunteers. They sailed up the Trinity River to Atascosito where they built two small forts. Mexican governor Antonio María Martínez, having heard about this expedition, sent his own troops to San Marcos, wary of an attack. The colony was abandoned shortly afterwards.

Champ d'Asile - Wikipedia
 
Apr 2010
1,039
evergreen state, USA
For a while, years ago, I thought a woman with the Noailles last name was in my tree. From what I gathered from other trees at the time, two sisters of that family fled France and headed to New York. There was a storm at sea, and the burly sailors threw heavy things overboard including a chest with the sisters' valuable assets. They didn't have much money, but had all sorts of household treasures, silver things, etc. So the sisters, being resourceful, worked in a cafe or nightspot singing and dancing French songs, etc. One of the sisters, Marie Noailles d'Ayen, married a Lee, that at the time of my research, I thought I was related to. But it turned out to be another Lee line that I'm connected to. Actually, they all had the same paternal Lee ancestor back in England. The other sister ended up in a Dutch town up the Hudson River a ways. They knew LaFayette, who advised them to go to America.
 
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May 2017
1,160
France
Very interesting.But how did they live in Philadelphia ? Professional activities ? Religion ? and of course food….I have visited the US museum near Bath (England): the cooker offered to the french students the US cakes of the XVIIIth century which had a very strong taste.