French Historiography

Oct 2011
7,654
MARE PACIFICVM
#1
They say that French historiography begins with Michelet... but I think that's a bit simplistic.

This thread is a place where we can compile a list of noteworthy French or francophone historians deserving of our time and attention.

So who are your favorites, and if you have a moment, why?
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,769
Western Eurasia
#6
Fernand Braudel and the Annales school of "total history."
x2 Braudel is the best!

Btw have others read Henri Pirenne's Historie économique et sociale du Moyen Age (i don't know its English title, i guess smthing like ~ The economic and social history of the middle ages)? I have the book but haven't started it, too many other books on my read list and i'm little bit worried if it is too outdated?
 
Oct 2011
7,654
MARE PACIFICVM
#7
x2 Braudel is the best!

Btw have others read Henri Pirenne's Historie économique et sociale du Moyen Age (i don't know its English title, i guess smthing like ~ The economic and social history of the middle ages)? I have the book but haven't started it, too many other books on my read list and i'm little bit worried if it is too outdated?
I haven't read it, but personally I think that history books are never outdated, just a reflection of the time they were written.

I still enjoy Michelet's Histoire de France even though most modern historian's consider it outdated and often innaccurate - but it serves as an insight into how historians of the 19th century viewed French history, and that is the benefit of historiography, after all.
 

Pendennis

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
3,386
Kirkcaldy, Scotland
#8
Alfred Cobban was de rigeur in Scottish universities in the 1960's as a base book on French history-his works was published in several volumes by ''Penguin '' books.
And on the Franco-Prussian War and the aftermath i.e. the Paris commune in 1870 you won't get much better than Britain's Alistair Horne.
 
Apr 2015
627
Paris
#10
Bloch's Feudal Society is one of the most efficient synthesis on feudalism, away from Ganshof's legal history point of view. The Kings' Touch is also a founding book in his way to write history. Of course, Bloch's works are almost a century old, so many things are out-of-date.