French Republican (Revolutionary) Calendar

Would it be beneficial to use this Calendar today?


  • Total voters
    14
Feb 2014
1,863
Kingdom of the Netherlands
#11
In general, that is true. Although I would include other larger cities along with Paris. But most Frenchmen did find it a bit odd. But that was then. Today, France is a VERY secular nation. And the USA is so multi-religious the Gregorian calendar here is absurd, as it is in Israel, China, and Saudi Arabia. Better to use an entirely secular one for secular purposes, and leave the religious ones for that. But, hey, it's cool. Just my thoughts.
The question still remains. Why break with centuries old tradition just for the sake of pragmatism? This is what was wrong back then when revolutionary zealots tried to rid the average Frenchman of the stable constant factors in life. Today it is wrong because our identity as Europeans still very much revolves around the Faustian spirit and build upon the pillars of christianity. By removing the Gregorian calander you remove one of those fundamental pillars that keeps the fabric of society together. I wouls never propgate the forceful abandoning of traditions, if traditions change its because a majority of the people want it so.

Also France still hold a large Catholic population. And regrettably also a lot of newcomers.
 
Jan 2010
4,373
Atlanta, Georgia USA
#13
No. The current one is working pretty well, so why cause a lot of turmoil and extra work e.g. by making dates depend on lunar sightings rather than just an automatic start on January 1?

Europe has still not gotten entirely on the Gregorian calendar (e.g. the Russian Orthodox Church is still on the Julian calendar), so how many years until this innovation would take hold? And what if the UK dissents?
 
Apr 2017
484
Sioux City, IA
#14
Well, now the calendar would be done by simple mathematics, as it was planned to be starting in 1820. I have a Revolutionary wall calendar that uses the Gregorian rule for Leap Year, and keeps track of dates against the current calendar until the end of 2020.
 
Apr 2017
484
Sioux City, IA
#15
No. The current one is working pretty well, so why cause a lot of turmoil and extra work e.g. by making dates depend on lunar sightings rather than just an automatic start on January 1?

Europe has still not gotten entirely on the Gregorian calendar (e.g. the Russian Orthodox Church is still on the Julian calendar), so how many years until this innovation would take hold? And what if the UK dissents?
The question of course, does not just involve Europe. What about Saudi Arabia (and other Muslim States), Israel, China, Vietnam, Japan, the Coptic and related Churches, Iran, and any other country I might have missed? Each one I named uses their own calendar, and has been forced to use the Gregorian Calendar, an inherently Christian (and WESTERN Christian at that!) device, for telling time outside their own country. India should be added also, and nearby States.

Given that Mandarin has more speakers than any other language, it would seem logical to use theirs. The Maya Calendar has been deemed the most accurate. Why not use it?

Again, I am suggesting that the French Calendar be adopted for business and secular purposes. Obviously, people would continue to use their own calendars for religious and other needs.

As to who would make such a decision, once you eliminate the UN and create a new organisation that actually serves a valid purpose, I would recommend them. And it would take affect immediately.

Clearly, one could make slight revisions in the Calendar. Instead of counting the Year of the Republic, one might count the Year of the World, or some such. Other slight changes could also be made as needed, but the basics are there, and need not change.
 
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Jan 2010
4,373
Atlanta, Georgia USA
#16
The question of course, does not just involve Europe. What about Saudi Arabia (and other Muslim States), Israel, China, Vietnam, Japan, the Coptic and related Churches, Iran, and any other country I might have missed? Each one I named uses their own calendar, and has been forced to use the Gregorian Calendar, an inherently Christian (and WESTERN Christian at that!) device, for telling time outside their own country. India should be added also, and nearby States.

Given that Mandarin has more speakers than any other language, it would seem logical to use theirs. The Maya Calendar has been deemed the most accurate. Why not use it?

Again, I am suggesting that the French Calendar be adopted for business and secular purposes. Obviously, people would continue to use their own calendars for religious and other needs.

As to who would make such a decision, once you eliminate the UN and create a new organisation that actually serves a valid purpose, I would recommend them. And it would take affect immediately.

Clearly, one could make slight revisions in the Calendar. Instead of counting the Year of the Republic, one might count the Year of the World, or some such. Other slight changes could also be made as needed, but the basics are there, and need not change.
If we chose the official Chinese calendar, we'd still have the Gregorian.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_calendar You claim someone forced China onto the Gregorian calendar. Who?

And right now people can use their own calendars for their own purposes. I personally think about the year as if it began at the vernal equinox, but think changing it would inconvenience almost all the world.

And your last suggestion looks like "Today (whenever it is) the calendar, tomorrow the world."
 
Apr 2017
484
Sioux City, IA
#17
No, I understood that China does use the Gregorian Calendar now. I should have specified that. I referred to those calendars generally speaking, although some of them are used officially, and the Chinese PEOPLE still celebrate cultural and religious festivals according to the traditional calendar.

Russia uses the Gregorian Calendar, but the Russian Church uses the Julian. India may also use the Gregorian Calendar for all I know. I have not checked. But that is not the point. NO ONE uses the Maya Calendar, except people in the highlands of Southern Mexico and Guatemala, who frequently use their own local Maya dialect (often they speak little or NO Spanish). Their religion, whilst officially Roman Catholic and using the Gregorian Calendar, is in reality a folk religion blending their native beliefs that were NEVER crushed out by the Spanish Padres and Hidalgos, and Roman Catholicism. As a result, they use TWO calendrical systems for their daily life. Or more accurately FOUR, since the Maya Calendar is in reality THREE separate calendars, each used for different purposes.

Since the Maya Calendar is clearly more accurate than the others, being able to handle Leap Years, Equinoxes, Solstices, etc. for hundreds and hundreds of years longer than the Gregorian, and from what I understand others as well, we SHOULD all use that, practically speaking.

But why does this matter even come up? Seems stupid, yes, something as mundane as the calendar? But that is exactly the point! It is interesting you mention the Vernal Equinox. England for CENTURIES rang in her New Year on 25 March, just AFTER said Equinox. They did this all the way up to 1752, upon adopting the Gregorian Calendar. This included the 13 Colonies, who began (with the rest of Britain and its Empire except Scotland [I'll get to that]) 1751 on 25 March but started 1752 on 1 January. In addition, to make the calendar change, Wednesday 2 September 1752 was followed by Thursday 14 September 1752. Ergo, 1751 had 282 days in it. 1752 had 355 days.

Scotland, for whatever reason had been using 1 January as the New Year since 1600, when it decided before union with England in 1603 under one monarch, and political Union with England as one country in 1707, to make that change then. Why Scotland did it in 1600 and England not for 152 more years I am not sure. But it WAS still on the Julian Calendar until the 1751-52 business.

This 25 March date was used because 1 January did not suit tenant farmers and landlords for ending and beginning new years. It was best to renew the contract when a farmer moved from field to field. And this was going to occur at or near the Vernal Equinox. 25 March was used because it was a major Church Festival, Lady Day, more formally known as the Feast of the Annunciation of the Lord to the Blessed Virgin Mary. Strangely, the RELIGIOUS New Year in England and Wales had been 1 January since the 1400's. Go figure.

And NOW we get to the POINT of this whole messy business! Why worry about the calendar? THIS IS WHY! Because its a confusing cluster-bomb at present! LOOK at this mess! A whole worldwide Empire had to go through he!! just to figure out what day it was! And WE have the temerity to whine about four hours jet lag!

So here is where it comes down to it. Was China FORCED to adopt the Gregorian Calendar? Not in the sense if being at bayonet point. But just like England had to go Gregorian in the 1750's in order to trade with Europe, China, to adapt and trade with the West, adopted the Gregorian Calendar, although I note the Chinese Calendar is official in both the ROC and the PRC as well.

Saudi Arabia, I note, adopted the Gregorian Calendar for civil purposes at the end of last year. So there you see, one of the most dominant and significant Officially Muslim States is forced to use the Gregorian Calendar. (TO BE CONTIUED AFTER I GET SOME SLEEP).
 
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Apr 2017
484
Sioux City, IA
#18
Well, to continue, I hope. It appears the the Kalendae, or the 1st of January was the time of the Roman New Year starting in 153 BC. This was when the new Consul took office. Previously, it had been done when he took office on the Ides of March (15 March), which was the date affixed in 222 BC. So when the Consul took office, that's when New Year was. This might explain, or not, why the Church New Year started on 1 January, which in and of itself is a curious thing, given that now in Western Christianity, the Church year starts with Advent.

Bit this is all by the by. The fundamental point I am trying to make is that, although I would define myself as right wing, and I do not apologise for the successes of Europe and Christianity, it seems to me for it to be completely absurd that Saudi Arabia should have to use a Christian Calendar for any reasons. I have my issues with Islam (NOT o be discussed here), but one thing can be said about the Muslims, PARTICULARLY in the Middle East. They have LOOOOOOOOOOOOG memories. They are still angry foe losing the Battles of Tours! That is part of why they hate so much now. And when say "they", I speak generally. I am sure, from my own experience, that there are many wonderful Muslims in the world who wish no ill upon us.

But why make people, some of whom are already inclined to dislike us, even more irritated by forcing an artifact such as a calendar, so significant to religion that it was created by a Pope, upon them. Isn't that quite rude!

Instead we have one we can suggest to the whole world. It is inherently logical, devoid of religious display, and the last five festivals (6 in a Leap Year) can be designated to any festivals you like outside France, as to be decided by governing authority. That is the point of the Republican Calendar. It can be used worldwide and adapted as needed to each country.

Thoughts?
 
Apr 2017
484
Sioux City, IA
#20
Not really. The name for each day was a way to secularise the calendar. Before this, the Gregorian Calendar used in France had each day designated to one or more Saints. I doubt that EVERY Frenchman remembered EVERY Saint on the Calendar, and you KNOW they don't now, since France is more secular. In many countries using the Gregorian Calendar (Saudi Arabia being an example), they could give a rat's hind END what Saint Day it is. The Republican Calendar is a perpetual one. You simply post it to the wall, like the one I have, with its lovely artwork to remind you of what Name Day it is. Or, you don't care about Name Days, and ignore them, just like most people do Saint Days. One might remember one's Name Day of birth, but that might be it, or perhaps one's marriage, or any other significant date. I was born on 9 Prairial CLXXXII, Wild Thyme (29 May 1974). This year 9 Prairial coincides with 28 May.

It should be noted that the previous entry does have a lot of typos in it. I am sorry. I was rather sleepy at the time. I wanted to say "the Battles of Tours and Lepanto", and of course the misspellings are evident. Regrets.
 
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