french surrender a strategy?

Nov 2019
4
a very dark place
the french have been derided for decades for a quick surrender to germany. is it possible that the allies allowed this as part of their strategy?
the result was that germany was now forced to defend the entire french coastline. this cost germany money, material and manpower. none of which they had in abundance. (relative to the allied forces)
also, did germany blunder by not following the example of their allies japan? in the pacific japan often ceded the beach to the marines. the result was to create a logjam/bottleneck of men and material. only then did japanese forces engage the marines.
if germany had done something similar and setup a defensive perimeter around/in front paris they would have had a smaller area to hold. they could have concentrated their forces. as it was a large number of germany soldiers never engaged anyone.
 

MG1962a

Ad Honorem
Mar 2019
2,211
Kansas
in the pacific japan often ceded the beach to the marines. the result was to create a logjam/bottleneck of men and material. only then did japanese forces engage the marines.
They tried the tactic once.
 
Jan 2019
180
Finland
the french have been derided for decades for a quick surrender to germany. is it possible that the allies allowed this as part of their strategy?
the result was that germany was now forced to defend the entire french coastline. this cost germany money, material and manpower. none of which they had in abundance. (relative to the allied forces)
also, did germany blunder by not following the example of their allies japan? in the pacific japan often ceded the beach to the marines. the result was to create a logjam/bottleneck of men and material. only then did japanese forces engage the marines.
if germany had done something similar and setup a defensive perimeter around/in front paris they would have had a smaller area to hold. they could have concentrated their forces. as it was a large number of germany soldiers never engaged anyone.
While at a later stage Germany had to expend a lot of resources in holding France, Germany also got access to much of France's resources and eliminated a major threat on the continent. To suggest that France's surrender was a stratagem on the allies' part is pretty harebrained, as certainly a France that doesn't fall and is a thorn on Germany's side constrains Germany to a larger extent. The prescience required is implausible.

On defending the beaches versus holding back inland, IIRC that was a point of contention among the Germans. Runstedt argued for holding back and striking back at the beach head so that the Germans could strike back with maximum concentration of forces, Rommel argued that Allied airpower could interdict any German offensive so the invasion should be stopped at the beaches. But making a defence perimeter around Paris? Why not just bypass that and let the Germans wither away alá Island Hopping?
 

MG1962a

Ad Honorem
Mar 2019
2,211
Kansas
I don't know about ceding the beach to marines but the Japanese ceded the beach to the Army at Leyte and Luzon and made their fights inland.
On Iowa Jima, it was a deliberate tactic used by the defenders to lessen the impact of the onshore bombardment by concealing their positions until enough Americans were on the beach to make the greatest impact.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
6,164
Portugal
the french have been derided for decades for a quick surrender to germany. is it possible that the allies allowed this as part of their strategy?
the result was that germany was now forced to defend the entire french coastline. this cost germany money, material and manpower. none of which they had in abundance. (relative to the allied forces)
This idea is based on?
 

deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
14,675
Europix
is it possible that the allies allowed this as part of their strategy?
[...]
this cost germany money, material and manpower. none of which they had in abundance. (relative to the allied forces)
And to lure Germany, Allies decided that having the French army annihilated (like in 1,800,000 POW, 2,000 planes and 2,000 armoured lost, 80-90 divisions vanished) is worth while, as through doing that, they can jump better in the war a bit later ...
 
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betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,530
It was a negotiated peace made after the French and British forces had been totally defeated. Presumably Petain and others thought it was better to make some sort of agreement than be completely conquered.
 
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sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
5,397
Sydney
Silly ....
the Germans knew first hand of the fighting quality of the French soldiers , twenty years before

remember Verdun ,