German army decides to scrap G36 Rifle

Mrbsct

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
2,629
USA
#1
The German army has decided to scrap the G36 rifle due to overheating problems on its effect on accuracy. Since the frame and receiver are all aligned and plastic, it holds the metal barrel on through plastic. Once hot, this melts, making it unaligned effecting accuracy. I read one report that even on semi-automatic, after 150 rounds, the weapon is less accurate than the AK-47 and will not hit anything at 200 meters. HK previously blamed bad ammo, but the German military now announced that was not the case and will be scrapping the weapon.

Here is the report:

-Heating with continuous fire:By design, the G36 will significantly hotter than fire at continuous comparison weapons. “This leads to a decrease in the hit probability when G36 occurs even at low numbers of shots with all the studied types of ammunition and -losen.”

-Outside temperatures:When changing the outside temperatures hit probability Decrease “in partially significant”. The precision problems are most pronounced in the range 15 to 45 degrees Celsius.

-Humidity:“The change between dry and humid environment leads the G36 to such restrictions as a change in the ambient temperature.” The problem, however, presented a significantly slower.

-Sunlight:For side solar radiation forgave the weapon housing and shift on the meeting point of the rifle.

-Ammunition:The accuracy differs between the munitions from, although in some cases by 35 percentage points. The precision problem admit it but even with the best cartridges.”

With the G36 going away...what weapon will replace it?
 
Sep 2014
1,194
Queens, NYC
#2
I don't know about what would replace it; do you think now the iron is hot for Colt (AR-15 derivatives), Steyr (AUG), or FN to strike?

I'm mystified. None of the combat conditions cited seems to me to be difficult to test for. So, shouldn't these problems have been detected in pre-adoption testing?
 

Mrbsct

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
2,629
USA
#3
I'm mystified. None of the combat conditions cited seems to me to be difficult to test for. So, shouldn't these problems have been detected in pre-adoption testing?
They probably didn't test its accuracy while testing these conditions. They probably just threw it in dirt, fired 400 rounds, and said it was good.

The problem isn't operational reliability(the weapon works). The problem is accuracy. Yes, if the G36 is thrown in these conditions it will work great(it is one of the world's most reliable firearms, thrown in snow, mud, dirt it works fine) but its accuracy will be utterly useless.
 
Last edited:
Jan 2015
97
Germany
#4
Given the massive supply problems of the German Army, I can't really see them replacing all assault rifles in the near future.
Barely any aircraft are able to fly because they just don't have the replacement parts to fix them.

I've been looking at some German news reports, and all that has been decided yet is to not buy any additional G36 for the time being. One article mentioned that replacement could take 10 years (and in German military politics that really means 20+) and another one said that refitting 7,000 rifles with a different barrel could fix the problem. (We rarely have a lot of soliders outside the country.) Or they might buy new guns, but only for troops stationed in hot countries.
 
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Nemowork

Ad Honorem
Jan 2011
8,357
South of the barcodes
#5
HK 416

Production lines are ready to roll, its combat tested, effective and available from German manufacturers.

How definite are the problem or is it yet another spat in the German army procurement department?
 
Jan 2015
97
Germany
#6
Supposedly accuracy in hot confition goes down to 7%. HK says they are using cheap ammunition. A while back a considerable number was shipped to the Kurds who say it works really great for them.
And there has been some complaining about them since at least 2012. However, military misspending is one of the most popular topics for the parliamentary opposition parties (whichever that may be at any given time) to inflate into a major scandal of seemingly nation shaking proportion, which in the end usually leads to nothing. (Pretty much every German minister of defense gets fired before completing a term, though.)
 
Mar 2015
688
US
#7
Why does accuracy matter in an assault rifle? I thought in most cases soldiers can't see their enemies?

I've never been in the military, but just wondering.
 
Jan 2015
97
Germany
#8
Well, sometimes you do want to hit and not just lay down suppresive fire. In that situation, you'd want to have a rifle that can hit where you aim it.
 
Mar 2015
688
US
#9
Well, sometimes you do want to hit and not just lay down suppresive fire. In that situation, you'd want to have a rifle that can hit where you aim it.
Thanks, that makes sense.

Is there any possibility that politics is a factor? Apparently that assault rifle has been in use for a long time. I wondered if some manufacturer bribed somebody?
 
Jan 2015
97
Germany
#10
That is always the common accusation any time there are equipment problems with the German Army.

However, I think that it's simply because nobody thought of testing the weapons for reliability in hot environments at the time. The G36 was developed at the start of the 90s when the army leadership still consisted entirely of officers who had been preparing for a possible Soviet invasion of Germany all their life. And Germany had a very strict policy of not deploying combat troops outside in other countries until 1999, when the G36 had already been adopted for several years.
That German soldiers could do any fighting in deserts was completely inconceivable at that time, so it most likely wasn't part of the tests at all. I would actually be surprised if the original purchase contract even included the requirement to be reliable in prolonged hot conditions.
Not entirely sure about German activities in Afghanistan, but the first German soldier killed in a firefight was in 2009 and the first few injured in 2006. And I believe first reports of problems started in 2010. So it might be quite probable that the problem wasn't noticed before because the situation where it would become a problem just didn't occure a lot until then.

I am not too familiar with firearm reliability, but I think a difference of 20 degrees in air temperature makes quite a big difference when it comes to overheating.
 

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