Germanic generals in the Roman army

Aug 2018
368
london
#1
I made a list from wikipedia of Germanic generals in the Roman army. Does anyone know if this is correct? I left out a few whose origins were uncertain.

From this it looks like Germanics basically controlled the Roman army prior to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire.


(Magister militum (Latin for "Master of the Soldiers", plural magistri militum) was a top-level military command used in the later Roman Empire. Used alone, the term referred to the senior military officer of the Empire (equivalent to a war theatre commander, the emperor remaining the supreme commander). Magister militum - Wikipedia



Bonitus, c.324 (Magister militum) Bonitus (magister militum) - Wikipedia

Silvanus, died 355 (Tribune, Magister militum per Gallias) Claudius Silvanus - Wikipedia

Areobindus, died 449 (Magister militum per Orientem) Areobindus (consul 434) - Wikipedia

Dagalaifus, c.366 (General, Consul) Dagalaifus (Roman Consul, 366) - Wikipedia

Vadomarius, c.363 (General, Dux of Phoenice) Vadomarius - Wikipedia

Merobaudes, died 383 (General, Consul) Merobaudes (general) - Wikipedia

Bauto, died c. 385 (Magister militum, Consul) Flavius Bauto - Wikipedia

Arbogast, died 394 (Magister militum) Arbogast (general) - Wikipedia

Mallobaudes, 4th c. (Principal officer of Emperor Gratian) Mallobaudes - Wikipedia

Richomer, late 4th c. (Magister militum, Consul) Richomeres - Wikipedia

Gainas, died 400 (Magister militum) Gainas - Wikipedia

Fravitta, died 402 (Magister militum, Consul) Fravitta - Wikipedia

Stilicho, c. 359 – 408 (Magister militum, Regent of the Emperor Honorius, Consul) Stilicho - Wikipedia

Alaric, 370 – 410 AD (Magister militum) Alaric I - Wikipedia

Ariovindus, died 449 (General, Consul) Areobindus Dagalaiphus Areobindus - Wikipedia

Remistus, died 456 (Magister militum) Remistus - Wikipedia

Aspar, c. 400 – 471 (Magister militum, Patrician) Aspar - Wikipedia

Ricimer, c.405 – 472 (Magister militum) Ricimer - Wikipedia

Ovida, died 480 (General) Ovida - Wikipedia

Childeric I, c. 437 – 481 AD (Commander) Franks - Wikipedia

Onoulphus died 493 (Magister militum per Illyricum) Onoulphus - Wikipedia

Gundobad, c. 452 – 516 AD (Magister militum, Patrician) Gundobad - Wikipedia

Theoderic, 454 – 526 AD (Magister militum, Patrician, Consul, King of Italy) Theoderic the Great - Wikipedia

Mundo, died 536 (Magister militum per Illyricum) Mundus (general) - Wikipedia
 

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,531
Dispargum
#2
Mallobaudes and Merobaudes are probably the same man although there may have been another man with the same name who may have held a command in Egypt about the same time. The fourth century Merobaudes may have had a son or grandson also named Merobaudes who flourished in the 430s and 440s and was probably an ally of Aetius. The younger Merobaudes was more of a courtier than a soldier although he did occasionally take the field. You might not want to list the younger Merobaudes as a barbarian general because he comes across in the records as thoroughly Romanized. He was more of poet and a lawyer than a soldier. The only barbarian thing about him was his name and ancestry.
 
Aug 2018
368
london
#4
f
You might not want to list the younger Merobaudes as a barbarian general because he comes across in the records as thoroughly Romanized. He was more of poet and a lawyer than a soldier. The only barbarian thing about him was his name and ancestry.
If he became Romanized does that mean he was no longer Germanic? I didn't say anything about 'barbarian'.
 
Aug 2018
368
london
#5
The fourth century Merobaudes may have had a son or grandson also named Merobaudes who flourished in the 430s and 440s and was probably an ally of Aetius.
Apparently Aetius' father may have also been of Germanic origin:

"Flavius Gaudentius (or simply Gaudentius) (died 425 AD) was the father of the Roman magister militum Flavius Aetius and married to an Italian noblewoman.[1] He was of Scythian origin.[2][3] As the term "Scythian" was frequently used in the late-Roman period for East Germanic tribes, Joseph Cummins notes that Gaudentius was possibly of Gothic origin.[3]

Gaudentius served under the Eastern Roman Emperor Theodosius I against the usurper Eugenius. Later, when his son Flavius Aetius was born in 396, Gaudentius served as magister equitum, or Master of Cavalry, under the Emperor Honorius. In 399, he served as the Comes Africae (count of Africa). Presumably he was Christian, as Augustine of Hippoclaimed that he destroyed pagan temples in Carthage.[4] According to The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Gaudentius was still serving the Western Empire in the 420s as magister militum of the Western Roman Empire. He served under the usurper Ioannes until his death in a military uprising in Gaul in 425.[1]"

Flavius Gaudentius - Wikipedia
 

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,531
Dispargum
#7
If he became Romanized does that mean he was no longer Germanic? I didn't say anything about 'barbarian'.
OK, then you can insert 'Germanic' where I said 'barbarian' and the argument remains the same. The younger Merobaudes probably considered himself a Roman rather than a German. He was the probably the result of at least one and possibly several generations of Germanic and Roman intermarriage. It's a nature vs nurture argument. Is ethnicity all in one's genes or does environment also determine ethnic identity? Can a person decide his or her own ethnic identity or is it beyond their control? My ancestors were not always Americans. I know where they came from, but if I went back there, I could not blend in or even function there. I no longer identify with where my ancestors came from. Similarly, I doubt the younger Merobaudes thought he was a German. Most of the other generals on your list were probably closer to their Germanic roots.
 
Aug 2018
368
london
#8
I think you might be right about Merobaudes and Mallobaudes being the same person. Their stories are too similar. The romanized son or grandson doesn't appear to have been a general.
 
Sep 2014
804
Texas
#10
Stilicho, one of the most honest men in the late Roman Empire (yeah I prejudiced) was half Roman. Mom was impressed by a cute Vandal on a horse. It was his execution by Honorius that led Alaric, pissed off at what the Emperor did to the German women and children, that led to his retalitory ride through the Empire.
And I thought Alaric was never higher than a captain.
 

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