Germanic generals in the Roman army

Nov 2010
7,332
Cornwall
#11
I think you've missed out Walia as well (Valia). Destroyed the Alans and Silingian Vandals in Hispania. Also Theodoric II who destroyed the Suevos. Though I'm not sure how 'Roman' his army was, nor Theodoric I who died at Catalaunian Plains
 
Feb 2017
425
Rock Hill, South Carolina
#12
Flavius Gaudentius is described as a Scythian from Durostorum. In all likelihood he was Thracian Roman, not Gothic. Scythian is a generic term and that was the region of the empire referred to sometimes as Scythia.

Ardabur and Aspar weren't Germanic, they were Indo-Iranian. You've also missed Frederic, Sigisvult, Ve(r?)tericus, Arnegisclus, Anagastes, Ostrys, and Nepotianus.
 
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Aug 2011
92
The Castle Anthrax
#14
...Germanics basically controlled the Roman army prior to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire.
That control was often tenuous given the usual Imperial envy vs. success and general political instability. The Germanic - Roman interface was intriguing all the way down from Arminius/Hermann or even Caesar's intentions before. Rome once had it's legionary gaze fixed east of the Rhine, but never conquered. The martial prowess of the individual barbarian was highly esteemed in Rome despite an otherwise elitist attitude among Romans. Perhaps if the Germanic tribes had any unity/organization they would have conquered Rome earlier, or more completely; however, as it turned out they seemed content to integrate with the established Roman structure. I would imagine that at this point in the Empire, the influence of The Church had a lot to do with preserving the existing political structures regardless of who was strongest.
 
Aug 2011
92
The Castle Anthrax
#16
Phalo said:
The Germanic - Roman interface was intriguing all the way down from Arminius/Hermann or even Caesar's intentions before.
Click to expand...
Can you recommend a book on that subject?
Yes I can...

A British Army officer spent years of his spare time trying to locate the site of the battle between Varus and trusted leader of the attached German auxiliaries Arminius, or by his German name, Hermann. The British officer succeeded in locating the actual ambush site and since then, several good books have been published about the battle:

"The Battle That Stopped Rome." - Peter S Wells
Osprey also has one, "The Teutoberg Forrest AD:9"

I see on Amazon that there are two others that I have not read... yet. The two I mention come highly recommended. In typical fashion the Osprey one is brief, pleasantly visual and mostly archeological in scope. Peter S. Wells' work has several chapters that discuss the circumstances surrounding the build up to the fight and the resultant consequences. It is much more historical in discipline.
This is one of the great events in Roman history I have come across from a "Truth is stranger than fiction" perspective. The human element, drama if you will, is compelling. It's the stuff of Shakespeare. The old veteran Roman bureaucrat in Varus verses the young, bold, and ethnic member of the enemy, Arminius. It all ended in the unprecedented defeat of no less than three Roman Legions (At or near the pinnacle of Roman military might) and the loss of two of their Aquilae.
As far as Caesar's intentions, I don't know of any books that specifically discuss late Republic plans. Obviously internal instability/opportunity halted Caesar's aspirations of border expansion. I would have to believe that any discussion about this would be mostly, if not all, speculative.
 

caldrail

Ad Honorem
Feb 2012
5,148
#20
As far as Caesar's intentions, I don't know of any books that specifically discuss late Republic plans. Obviously internal instability/opportunity halted Caesar's aspirations of border expansion. I would have to believe that any discussion about this would be mostly, if not all, speculative.
It's known that he was preparing a campaign against the Parthians. His death occurred shortly before the expected date that the march would begin.
 
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