Germany's Current Population if Germany Wins World War I

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
If Germany would have won World War I, then what would Germany's current population be?

After all, a victorious Germany might not have to deal with World War II afterwards and might also experience a baby boom as a result of its victory in World War I. Plus, Germany might annex some territories after its victory in World War I and might also annex the German-majority parts of Austria-Hungary if Austria-Hungary will still eventually collapse in this scenario. In addition to this, if Germany eventually experiences a Social Democratic-led revolution in this scenario, then Germany might very well experience massive immigration from other countries (eventually including non-White countries as well) due to its wealth and economic prosperity.

Anyway, any thoughts on this?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
Also, it is worth noting that Germany would currently have much more living space (Lebensraum ;)) in this scenario than it currently has in real life. In turn, this will allow Germany to have a larger population than it has in real life before it experiences the strain of overpopulation.
 
Oct 2015
5
USA
a factor question, what about the depression? How would that factor in? Are we assuming they would take less damage or more?

Also, the territories they would have due to winning, are they overpopulated now? If so, then we could assume that the massive influx due to the aforementioned factors would have overpopulated the country years ago and possibly brought about a collapse?

I'm actually doing some fact checking right now so I can have a better idea of what I'm talking about. But those are my first thoughts.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
a factor question, what about the depression? How would that factor in? Are we assuming they would take less damage or more?
If the Great Depression still occurs in this scenario, then I expect Germany to (more-or-less) successfully deal with it in a similar way to how Japan dealt with it in real life--specifically, by pillaging neighboring countries (as in, its Eastern European puppet states) in order to provide natural resources (and whatnot) for itself so that Germany can stimulate its own economy.

Also, the territories they would have due to winning, are they overpopulated now?
No, they are not overpopulated now (nor will they be in this scenario). After all, Lorraine, Franche-Comte, and the Baltic states were sparsely populated and the Polish Border Strip will become sparsely populated after Germany will deport all of the Poles and Jews from there.

If so, then we could assume that the massive influx due to the aforementioned factors would have overpopulated the country years ago and possibly brought about a collapse?
No, I don't think so.

I'm actually doing some fact checking right now so I can have a better idea of what I'm talking about. But those are my first thoughts.
OK, and good luck to you in regards to this! :)
 
Oct 2015
5
USA
so from what I found there were about 65 million after WWI, then add territory and they probably had about 86 million or so, possibly more depending on the territory gain.

from 1871-1913 their population had grown over 50% (41 million to 68 million) So including the boom, their victory, their already-powerful economy and overall strong science and technological front, I guess we could probably see about 200 million or so.
 
Oct 2015
5
USA
though, I feel like I low-balled that one. 200 is more like an absolute minimum if the growth could stay like that. But, there's not really an exponential point. I kinda just threw together some figures without the possible changing growth factor.

so if every 42 years there's a 60% increase then my look was too low. Should probably start at least 50 mil higher
 

WeisSaul

Ad Honorem
Mar 2012
2,836
New Amsterdam
Add the WWII German Death toll, Austria, Czechia, Slovenia, Alsace-Lorraine, and the Polish population to the 1939 german population and continue the rate of growth.

Also subtract the Turkish migration.

You'll probably end up with something between 110 to 130 million people
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
Add the WWII German Death toll, Austria, Czechia, Slovenia, Alsace-Lorraine, and the Polish population to the 1939 german population and continue the rate of growth.
Germany wouldn't have annexed all or even most of Poland, though. Plus, what about the Baltic states?

Also subtract the Turkish migration.
Couldn't Germany have still experienced large-scale migration from other parts of Europe and eventually (after the amount of racism in Germany became a lot less) from non-White countries as well in this scenario, though?

You'll probably end up with something between 110 to 130 million people
Please keep in mind that Germany might have had a somewhat higher total fertility rate in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s if it would have won World War I, though. Plus, it is worth noting that Germany's dominant position in Europe along with its massive prosperity could have caused more people to immigrate to Germany after the end of World War I in this scenario in comparison to real life.
 
Oct 2014
392
Germany
I agree with weissaul, something between 110 and 130 million seams to be the most likely.

There are territory wins after ww1 and no death during ww2 and millions of Germans wouldn't have left in Germany in the 1930s because of the NAZI regime.

But the population wouldn't have grown in the same rate as after the founding in 1871. Every developed economy has a slowdown of its population griwth. The same would count for Germany since the 1920s.
 
Aug 2014
1,832
Huntington Beach CA
Germany wouldn't have annexed all or even most of Poland, though. Plus, what about the Baltic states?



Couldn't Germany have still experienced large-scale migration from other parts of Europe and eventually (after the amount of racism in Germany became a lot less) from non-White countries as well in this scenario, though?



Please keep in mind that Germany might have had a somewhat higher total fertility rate in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s if it would have won World War I, though. Plus, it is worth noting that Germany's dominant position in Europe along with its massive prosperity could have caused more people to immigrate to Germany after the end of World War I in this scenario in comparison to real life.
I'm not sure the Germans wouldn't have annexed much of Poland. Unlike the Nazis, the Kaiserreich placed a great deal of faith in education. The Germans would have attempted to "Germanise" the Poles and Lithuanians they conquered and might have been at least partially successful. At least the Poles would have become bilingual in German. Poland has a great deal of coal in Eastern Silesia and Galicia and Germany would have wanted it for industrial expansion.
Kaiserreich also might well have had an agricultural revolution similar to what was happening in the US at the time. Things like tractors and farm trucks and combine harvesters and paved roads. in the 20s and 30s. German colonies would have helped also, particularly Kamerun and Togoland. Maybe even Tanganyika and New Guinea. Southwest Africa, too dry for much except diamond and copper (Swakopmund) production. And Germany might well have gotten French West and French Equatorial Africa as part of the peace settlement. Maybe even Indochina and New Caledonia.