Greatest general of the middle ages

Mar 2019
23
Amsterdam
#33
Genghis Khan - I think there is no need to introduce the reasons for why he is one of the greatest if not the greatest general.

Subutai Baghatur - was an Uriankhai general and the primary military strategist of Genghis Khan. He directed more than 20 campaigns in which he conquered 32 nations and won 65 pitched battles, during which he conquered or overran more territory than any other commander in history.

Saladin - known in the West as Saladin, was the most celebrated Islamic ruler and military leader of the Middle Ages. Saladin led the Muslim military campaign against the Crusader states in the Levant. At the height of his power, his sultanate included Egypt, Syria, Upper Mesopotamia, the Hejaz, Yemen and other parts of North Africa

Baibars the Malmuk - He proved particularly adept at siegecraft; and took fortresses previously thought to be impregnable. Such as the fabled Krak des Chevaliers, in 1271. He is also on this list because he was able to assassinate the Sultan and take the throne for himself.

Alfred the Great - Though often portrayed as a man of peace, more an administrator than a warrior. However, Alfred fought perhaps more battles with greater success than any other King in English history.
 
Mar 2016
1,199
Australia
#34
Genghis Khan - I think there is no need to introduce the reasons for why he is one of the greatest if not the greatest general.

Subutai Baghatur - was an Uriankhai general and the primary military strategist of Genghis Khan. He directed more than 20 campaigns in which he conquered 32 nations and won 65 pitched battles, during which he conquered or overran more territory than any other commander in history.

Saladin - known in the West as Saladin, was the most celebrated Islamic ruler and military leader of the Middle Ages. Saladin led the Muslim military campaign against the Crusader states in the Levant. At the height of his power, his sultanate included Egypt, Syria, Upper Mesopotamia, the Hejaz, Yemen and other parts of North Africa

Baibars the Malmuk - He proved particularly adept at siegecraft; and took fortresses previously thought to be impregnable. Such as the fabled Krak des Chevaliers, in 1271. He is also on this list because he was able to assassinate the Sultan and take the throne for himself.

Alfred the Great - Though often portrayed as a man of peace, more an administrator than a warrior. However, Alfred fought perhaps more battles with greater success than any other King in English history.
Saladin was a great statesman and ruler, but fairly overrated as a general. He was defeated on multiple occasions by smaller crusader armies (against Baldwin IV, and later Richard I) and was overly cautious on occasion, which led to prolonged campaigns that could have been shortened and had a more successful outcome. His greatest success, the defeat of the crusaders at Hattin, wasn't that impressive from a tactical perspective. Even despite the crusaders being exhausted, dehydrated and vastly outnumbered and surrounded, they still fought fiercely and almost turned the tide of the battle. Saladin panicked and thought he might lose at one point. His conquest of the Holy Land after Hattin was a walk in the park, since almost every town and fortress surrendered without a fight. He failed to take Acre despite having overwhelming numbers yet again and two years head start on the crusader reinforcements. This was a failure of enormous proportions that even he acknowledged.

Also, did Alfred really fight that many battles? Aside from the 878 campaign, which other military campaigns did he lead that involved large-scale operations and not just skirmishing and and taking towns that surrendered? Details of wars in this era are very vague and incomplete. Pitched battles in the medieval era were very rare, especially in the early medieval era, so I'd be very surprised if Alfred fought that many. Happy to be corrected, though.