Greatest ruler of antiquity

Mar 2018
93
Almaty, Kazakhstan
#1
There is a similar thread on the Medieval and Byzantine history forum, i decided that one should be added into this one aswell.

Who in your opinion is the best ruler of antiquity, this is concerning not only military achievements, but also the well being of the ppl living in the kingdom/empire as well as cultural achievements.

So go ahead and post your ruler of antiquity. Might aswell include roman consuls into the mix.
 
Jun 2017
2,501
Connecticut
#2
Cyrus. World had a somewhat 19th-20th centuryish balance of power between four powers. Cyrus took three out of four over(and set up his son to do the honors for the fourth) created an empire that was well over three times larger than any previous and encompassed over 40 percent of the global population. He did this all in the span of about twenty to thirty years. Alexander took out one entity by slaying the king and he went for the empire's frontier before proceeding into the Middle Eastern heartland.
 
Jan 2015
3,347
Australia
#3
Augustus. Thread. Not the greatest Roman, but the greatest ruler certainly. His sheer longevity and accomplishments make it hard to plausibly compare most rulers to him. He rose from no position of power and no real name recognition at age 19 to ruler of the Roman world, sharing or possessing absolute power for an absurd 56 years. 56! The Roman world was fundamentally changed in all sorts of ways during his reign too; he instituted an entirely new system of government, and made it last well into the future.
 
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AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
24,490
Lago Maggiore, Italy
#4
In the far past, when the "King" was the absolute power [no division of powers], I tend to indicate a couple of sovereigns: Hammurabi [because of his code] and Horemheb [again because of his code].


It's just a personal opinion, but probably, when a Monarch wasn't forced by the institutional context to issue a code to be respected [also by Himself, this is important to underline], that a Sovereign decided to give to the People the certainty of a legal code ... well, that was a really great decision, to be remembered in the following centuries and beyond.
 
Mar 2013
1,341
Escandinavia y Mesopotamia
#5
Cyrus the Great, Augustus and Constantine the Great are the 3 most influential I would say taking into consideration of their achievements and impact. Constantine the Great perhaps the most influential giving the role of Christianity in the history and even today.

Constantine the Great I would say followed by Cyrus.
 
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Jan 2015
3,347
Australia
#6
Cyrus the Great, Augustus and Constantine the Great are the 3 most influential I would say taking into consideration of their achievements and impact. Constantine the Great perhaps the most influential giving the role of Christianity in the history and even today.

Constantine the Great I would say.
And spreading Christianity for future generations was a good thing?
 

Bart Dale

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
6,856
#7
And spreading Christianity for future generations was a good thing?
On the whole, yes. In Europe, at any rate, the Catholic version of it helped incorporate barbarians like the Anglo-Saxons, Scandinavians, Hungarians, Germans intellectually into a unifed civilization founded on the heritage classical Greco-Roman civilization. The Catholic church created the modern university system,, and it helped laid the basis for modern science and the Scientific Revolution through its philosophical outlook.


If you like a world where infant mortality rates are 25%, where the fastest way to get around is by horseback, and the fastest way to send a message was by pigeon, then the rise of Christianity was a bad thing, If you like our modern world and modern conveniences, then spreading Christianity was a good thing, because our modern world and modern conveniences would never have come about without it.

Cyrus was probably the greatest ruler of his age. But I think Augustus had a greater future impact.
 
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Mar 2013
1,341
Escandinavia y Mesopotamia
#8
And spreading Christianity for future generations was a good thing?
That depends on what you consider "a good thing". I am atheist, but now you asked my opinion I would gladly provide it. As an educated historian I think it is pretty obvious that the Christians are the best scientists, doctors, philophers, artists, soldiers and astronauts in the human history.

If there were Martians watching from Mars, and they studied the world history from the birth of Jesus until today they would probably think like this: "Wow, Christianity was a persecuted sect under Pagan rule, but it became the victorious one and seduced a great Roman Emperor, and during Antiquity and Middle Ages when a large part of Europe was undeveloped and primitive the monks brought learning with them alongside conversion, and in the 1600s the Scientific Revolution found place in Christian Italy where the Christians were the first people for first time that realized and distinguished Natural Philosophy from Natural Science and thus gave birth to the modern science, and in the 1700s the Industrial Revolution found place in the Christian England which paved the way for the modernization, and today the richest parts of the world are Christians, and Christians dominate science, wealth and the military aspect. They even send people on the moon!. The Christians are without any doubt the best and most productive and most successful people, and today the majority of religious freedom, freethought, secularism, liberal democracies mainly thrive among countries populated by the people who have Jesus in their heart".

This is what the Martians would think if they studied world history. Of the various superstitions I know and have studied the Christianity is without any doubt the best and most successful superstition.

I hope this answered your question.




Constantine the Great in York in England where he began his campaign and won the whole Roman Empire.
 
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