Greatest Samurai Warrior

Aug 2009
95
Wasn't a samurai supposed to commit seppuku after his lord died?

So, while those 47 were loyal to their lord and waited years to avenge his death, they actually broke the bushido code.

But as "greatest samurai warrior" you can only choose Musashi. I mean he is by far the most well known and popular samurai and also the supposedly strongest (I never heard anyone ever claiming someone was stronger than him, from his lifetime to the present).


But personally I favor Minamoto Yoshitsune for his incredibly broken Eight Ship Hop and Yukimura Sanada for his mad spear skills and hotbloodedness.
 
Sep 2009
90
NC United States
hm this is tough, but i agree that Miyamoto was one of the best swordsman in japan, i mean he dedicated his life to it. However to be samurai one had to follow Bushido very strictly, and in my opinion Yamamoto Tsunetomo would be a valid candidate. He studies Bushido to its core and lived by it. He then wrote the Hagakure or book of the samurai. I think a retainer who possessed his knowledge would have been a great samurai warrior. :rolleyes:
 
Jun 2009
512
California
hm this is tough, but i agree that Miyamoto was one of the best swordsman in japan, i mean he dedicated his life to it. However to be samurai one had to follow Bushido very strictly, and in my opinion Yamamoto Tsunetomo would be a valid candidate. He studies Bushido to its core and lived by it. He then wrote the Hagakure or book of the samurai. I think a retainer who possessed his knowledge would have been a great samurai warrior. :rolleyes:
Well, heck, during the Age of the Country at War, every samuri dedeciated his life to swordsmanship. One way or another. Particularly the ones who died in battle.

Musashi's career raises some interesting philosophical questions. On the one hand, it's been argued that he avoided several opponents who might well have been able to defeat him. On the other hand, I would argue that avoiding a fight one has a significant chance of losing could be the mark of a truly great warrior -- one of those intangible qualities that separate them from ordinary run-of-the-mill great warriors who charge in blindly trusting to their overall great warriorness, only to discover, "Oops, this guy's pretty good!" and then cleverly proceed to die, thus ensuring that they'll never have much of a reputation.
 

Thegn Ansgar

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
5,638
Canada
Wasn't a samurai supposed to commit seppuku after his lord died?
Largely a byproduct of an Edo era work that was meant to glorify an old age. From the Muromachi period all the way up to the end of the Azuchi-Momoyama period (which is really the main time line people think about when discussing samurai), this practice was rarely followed. Bushido was never written down until the Edo, and was not exactly an important aspect for many samurai.

But as "greatest samurai warrior" you can only choose Musashi. I mean he is by far the most well known and popular samurai and also the supposedly strongest (I never heard anyone ever claiming someone was stronger than him, from his lifetime to the present).
Perhaps among westerners Musashi is the most well known. However among the Japanese people, it is Yagyu Jubei, who was equally a great warrior. However I would say that these two men are duelists, and don't exactly classify as warriors.

But personally I favor Minamoto Yo****sune for his incredibly broken Eight Ship Hop and Yukimura Sanada for his mad spear skills and hotbloodedness.
As much as I like Sanada Nobushige, he wasn't exactly known for fighting. I would classify him as a great commander, but a lot of what was written of the feats he did at the Battle of Tennojiguchi is a fabrication at best.

I would say the greatest samurai warrior would be either Kato Kiyomasa (I mean, he fought tigers with just a spear while in Korea), or Uesugi Kenshin. Contrary to popular belief, many famous commanders rarely fought on the field of battle. Their skills were much too valuable for them to risk their lives.
 
Aug 2009
95
That last sentence should be disregarded, it was about Yo****sune in Persona 4 and Sanada in Sengoku Basara.

As for Musashi vs Yagyu, even in Japanese media I never heard of someone claiming Yagyu was stronger.
What I find a bit odd is that they lived at the same time, Musashi being about 20 years older, but never fought against each other.
 

Thegn Ansgar

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
5,638
Canada
That last sentence should be disregarded, it was about Yo****sune in Persona 4 and Sanada in Sengoku Basara.

As for Musashi vs Yagyu, even in Japanese media I never heard of someone claiming Yagyu was stronger.
What I find a bit odd is that they lived at the same time, Musashi being about 20 years older, but never fought against each other.
Not stronger, but Yagyu is the more popular one in Japan (strength is not relevant, there are plenty of strong individuals who can't fight worth a darn). As for why they never fought against each other... The Yagyu had more important things to do, heading up the Tokugawa security network.