Gun powder weapons

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
5,616
#2
When the French finally invaded Dahomey the Dahomeyans had been preparing, buying machine guns (French Reffyes) and even artillery (German Krupps), and a shedload of ammo. They certainly were aware of what modern firepower could do, and the pressing need to to keep up. In the end they didn't have the time to acquire the know-how to effectively use the modern firepower though. The Krupps in particular seem to have been left entirely unused.
 
Feb 2018
84
ohio
#3
When the French finally invaded Dahomey the Dahomeyans had been preparing, buying machine guns (French Reffyes) and even artillery (German Krupps), and a shedload of ammo. They certainly were aware of what modern firepower could do, and the pressing need to to keep up. In the end they didn't have the time to acquire the know-how to effectively use the modern firepower though. The Krupps in particular seem to have been left entirely unused.
Seemed like many of the organized states knew how to produce swivel guns and small basic cannonry, some even knew how to make gun powder. a major problem that inhibited large scale adoptions of such artillery and production was the Humidity affecting both native and imported guns and gunpowder this was noted by European merchants that guns would rust very quickly if not constantly maintained.
 

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
5,616
#4
Various African rulers did go to pretty considerable lengths to acquire western military grade rifles. Kabarega of Bunyoro was known to have formed a standing force of 1500 riflemen, mostly armed with British made army Snyder rifles or Jocelyn and Stars. The force was considered sufficiently worrisome that the Stanley Emin Pasha relief expedition (a small army in its own right) decided to completely skirt Kabarega's realm, for fear of possibly ending up in an un-friendly situation where it would simply be outgunned.

The Battle of Kanga’aho, January 1886- “Bagwigairebata Riffle” Leads Omukama Kabalega to Victory (Kabalega’s Reign Series……Part 1) | Bunyoro-Kitara Kingdom
 
Aug 2018
461
Southern Indiana
#5
Seemed like many of the organized states knew how to produce swivel guns and small basic cannonry, some even knew how to make gun powder. a major problem that inhibited large scale adoptions of such artillery and production was the Humidity affecting both native and imported guns and gunpowder this was noted by European merchants that guns would rust very quickly if not constantly maintained.
I've occasionally seen references to brass guns in the 1700's , I wonder if that is why they were made.
 

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