Had Carthage defeated Rome in the Punic Wars, would it have created a massive Mediterranean Empire just like the Romans did?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,961
SoCal
#1
Had Carthage defeated Rome in the Punic Wars, would it have created a massive Mediterranean Empire just like the Romans did? For the record, I'm thinking of having Carthage eventually control the entire or almost the entire seaboard of the Mediterranean in this scenario.
 
Jun 2015
5,730
UK
#2
Carthage had overseas holdings, and it well could have done. It knew how powerful the Roman Republic was, and with Rome expanding in Illyria, Greece, and into Gaul, it could have seized the opportunity for more holdings and trade.

One thing though is that Rome, especially after its Sack in the mid-Republic period, became a bit paranoid and militaristic due to this. by the time of the Punic Wars, it was more expanstionist than Carthage. Carthage may have grown a greater trading empire, than one of conquest like Rome did.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,961
SoCal
#3
Carthage had overseas holdings, and it well could have done. It knew how powerful the Roman Republic was, and with Rome expanding in Illyria, Greece, and into Gaul, it could have seized the opportunity for more holdings and trade.

One thing though is that Rome, especially after its Sack in the mid-Republic period, became a bit paranoid and militaristic due to this. by the time of the Punic Wars, it was more expanstionist than Carthage. Carthage may have grown a greater trading empire, than one of conquest like Rome did.
Why was Carthage not that interested in conquest?
 
Apr 2017
1,484
U.S.A.
#5
The Carthaginians were Phoenicians (the dominant population anyway) and took over their colonies after the homeland was conquered by Persia.
Carthage was more interested in a trading empire and as such ruled more indirectly than rome. They would not have had as large an empire as the Romans since they weren't interested in conquest as much and were much more mercantile based. They only took over so much of spain to fight rome, once rome fell they wouldn't expand as much. They certainly wouldn't expand anywhere near as far inland.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,961
SoCal
#6
The Carthaginians were Phoenicians (the dominant population anyway) and took over their colonies after the homeland was conquered by Persia.
Carthage was more interested in a trading empire and as such ruled more indirectly than rome. They would not have had as large an empire as the Romans since they weren't interested in conquest as much and were much more mercantile based. They only took over so much of spain to fight rome, once rome fell they wouldn't expand as much.
Makes sense.

Anyway, would they ever try to reconquer their homeland?

They certainly wouldn't expand anywhere near as far inland.
You mean into central Europe?
 
Apr 2017
1,484
U.S.A.
#7
Makes sense.

Anyway, would they ever try to reconquer their homeland?



You mean into central Europe?
Their homeland was ruled by significant land powers on the opposite side of the Mediterranean, so doubtful.
Yes, being a sea power it is doubtful they would have such ambitions.
The Carthaginians ruled more indirectly, leaving the people more as allies/tributaries. The Romans pushed direct rule and assimilation.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,961
SoCal
#8
Their homeland was ruled by significant land powers on the opposite side of the Mediterranean, so doubtful.
Yes, being a sea power it is doubtful they would have such ambitions.
The Carthaginians ruled more indirectly, leaving the people more as allies/tributaries. The Romans pushed direct rule and assimilation.
So, you don't think that the Phoenician language is likely to become widespread in this scenario?
 
Feb 2014
312
Miami
#9
Carthage would not create an empire but trade ports like what the Portuguese did in Asia and Africa. Carthage wanted money, not territory. We would probably have had the America’s discovered much earlier as the Phoenicians knew how to circumnavigate Africa and would only be a matter before they accidentally find South America and decide to explore it for more money opportunities
 
Apr 2017
1,484
U.S.A.
#10
So, you don't think that the Phoenician language is likely to become widespread in this scenario?
It would be comparable to the spread of Greek across the Mediterranean before Alexander the Great (and similar to what it was before the punic wars). If there was no Rome they may spread across the western Mediterranean but would still have rivals in the east.
 
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